CEUs for BCBAs

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CEUs for BCBAs

Foxylearning has been providing the best online CEUs for behavior analysts since 2010! Multimedia tutorials, interactive videos, and article quizzes available.

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An Introduction to Verbal Behavior

B.F. Skinner’s book Verbal Behavior provided a conceptual framework for both researchers and clinicians interested in human language. That book had two major components. First, it introduced a set of new concepts for classifying and analyzing verbal behavior. Second, it then used these new concepts to develop an innovative and profound analysis and interpretation of factors that account for the behavior of an individual speaker. However, much of the power and intricacies of that analysis are lost if the introductory material is not mastered first. This tutorial—based on a programmed instructional text of the same name first published by Behavior Associates, Inc. in 1978—provides a way to quickly and thoroughly master those concepts with a fully interactive, multimedia introduction to verbal behavior.

About the Author

Norman Peterson, Ph.D.

Dr. Norm Peterson recently retired as the Director of Operations at the Foundation for Behavioral Resources. He earned his Ph.D. in Psychology from Western Michigan University, where he was one of the first graduates of that department’s doctoral program in Behavior Analysis. Prior to his work at the Foundation, Dr. Peterson also served as a faculty member at Western Michigan University and as a senior HR Consultant at Consumers Energy.

Learning Objectives
Upon completing this tutorial, the learner should be able to:

  1. Identify definitions and examples of key theoretical concepts in Skinner’s analysis of human language (including verbal behavior, verbal stimulation, thematic and formal control, tact,
    mand, echoic, intraverbal, textual, taking dictation, audience control, types of extension, multiple causation, secondary verbal behavior, and autoclitic mands and tacts)
  2. Distinguish between formal and thematic control of verbal behavior
  3. Classify examples of the different ways verbal operants can be extended
  4. Specify the different ways we learn to respond to private stimulation
  5. Analyze samples of natural language using the terms and concepts of Skinner’s analysis of verbal behavior
Technical Requirements
The tutorial requires only an active internet connection and a relatively modern web browser with JavaScript enabled.
Accuracy, Utility, and Risks
The content of this tutorial should be considered quite accurate, as it was written by an expert in the field and reviewed for accuracy by a number of other experts, including Dr. Richard Malott, Dr. Jack Michael, Dr. Linda Parott Hayes, and Greg Stikeleather. This tutorial should benefit any psychologist, behavior analyst, student, or behavioral science professional who would like to have a conceptual framework for analyzing human language that is more functional than the structural analyses of traditional linguistics or cognitive psychology. It will be particularly beneficial to those working to establish verbal repertoires with children or adults who have language delays. This tutorial will not provide you with training in specific interventions or methods based on Skinner’s analysis of verbal behavior, but it will provide you with a conceptual understanding of the theoretical basis of such interventions and methods. There is little to no risk associated with completing this tutorial, aside from the physical risks associated with any computer work (e.g., repetitive stress injuries and eyestrain) and possibly boredom.
History
This tutorial is based on a programmed textbook that was initially written as part of the author’s dissertation research at Western Michigan University and originally published in 1978. It was launched as an online tutorial on Foxylearning in Adobe Flash format on May 28, 2010, with the first HTML5 version launching in May 2012. Significant updates were also released in June 2013 and January 2020.
Norman Peterson
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A Case Study in the Misrepresentation of Applied Behavior Analysis in Autism: The Gernsbacher Lectures

To earn credit, you will be required to read the article and pass a 5-question quiz about it. You can retake the quiz as many times as needed, but you will not receive exactly the same questions each time.

Abstract

This article presents a case study in the misrepresentation of applied behavior analysis for autism based on Morton Ann Gernsbacher’s presentation of a lecture titled ‘‘The Science of Autism: Beyond the Myths and Misconceptions.’’ Her misrepresentations involve the characterization of applied behavior analysis, descriptions of practice guidelines, reviews of the treatment literature, presentations of the clinical trials research, and conclusions about those trials (e.g., children’s improvements are due to development, not applied behavior analysis). The article also reviews applied behavior analysis’ professional endorsements and research support, and addresses issues in professional conduct. It ends by noting the deleterious effects that misrepresenting any research on autism (e.g., biological, developmental, behavioral) have on our understanding and treating it in a transdisciplinary context.

Edward K. Morris
1yesno$9.00
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Assessing and Treating Vocal Stereotypy in Children with Autism

To earn credit, you will be required to read the article and pass a 5-question quiz about it. You can retake the quiz as many times as needed, but you will not receive exactly the same questions each time.

Abstract

Previous research implies that stereotypic behavior tends to be maintained by the sensory consequences produced by engaging in the response. Few investigations, however, have focused on vocal stereotypy. The current study examined the noncommunicative vocalizations of 4 children with an autism spectrum disorder. First, functional analyses were conducted in an attempt to identify the function of each child’s behavior. For each of the participants, it was found that vocal stereotypy was likely not maintained by the social consequences. Following assessment, response interruption and redirection (RIRD) was implemented in an ABAB design to determine whether vocal stereotypy could be successfully redirected. RIRD involved a teacher issuing a series of vocal demands the child readily complied with during regular academic programming. Vocal demands were presented contingent on the occurrence of vocal stereotypy and were continuously presented until the child complied with three consecutively issued demands without emitting vocal stereotypy. For each child, RIRD produced levels of vocal stereotypy substantially lower than those observed in baseline. For 3 of the children, an increase in appropriate communication was also observed. The children’s teachers were trained to implement RIRD. Brief follow-up probes and anecdotal information implied that the treatment had a positive impact in the natural environment.

 

William H. Ahearn, Kathy M. Clark, Rebecca P. F. MacDonald, & Bo In Chung
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Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Generalized Social Anxiety Disorder: A Pilot Study

To earn credit, you will be required to read the article and pass a 5-question quiz about it. You can retake the quiz as many times as needed, but you will not receive exactly the same questions each time.

Abstract

Despite the demonstrated efficacy of cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) for social anxiety disorder (SAD), many individuals do not respond to treatment or demonstrate residual symptoms and impairment posttreatment. Preliminary evidence indicates that acceptance-based approaches (e.g., acceptance andcommitment therapy; ACT) can be helpful for a variety of disorders andemphasize exposure-based strategies and processes. Nineteen individualsdiagnosed with SAD participated in a 12-week program integrating exposuretherapy and ACT. Results revealed no changes across a 4-week baseline control period. From pretreatment to follow-up, significant improvements occurred in social anxiety symptoms and quality of life, yielding large effect size gains. Significant changes also were found in ACT-consistent process measures, and earlier changes in experiential avoidance predicted later changes in symptom severity. Results suggest the acceptability and potential efficacy of ACT forSAD and highlight the need for future research examining both the efficacy andmechanisms of change of acceptance-based programs for SAD.

Kristy L. Dalrymple & James D. Herbert
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Mastering the Basics of Visual Analysis

Visual analysis of data is a cornerstone of single-subject research. Yet some researchers have found that experts often disagree about what constitutes an intervention effect. This potential lack of consistency across visual analysts can have negative implications for both research and practice. This tutorial offers a systematic, evidence-based procedure for training individuals to conduct valid and reliable visual analyses of single-subject data. It features extensive discrimination training and practice opportunities; adaptive instruction and remediation for errors; and full audio narration in a self-paced, mobile-friendly format.

About the Authors

Katie Wolfe, Ph.D., BCBA-D

Dr. Katie Wolfe is an assistant professor of Special Education in the Department of Educational Studies at the University of South Carolina, where she teaches coursework in applied behavior analysis and early childhood special education. She received her PhD in Disability Disciplines from Utah State University in 2013 and is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst.

Timothy Slocum, Ph.D.

Dr. Timothy A. Slocum is a Professor and Department Head of the Department of Special Education & Rehabilitation at Utah State University. He earned his doctorate in Special Education at the University of Washington in 1991. Dr. Slocum received the 2011 Fred S. Keller Behavioral Education award from Division 25 of the American Psychological Association and the 2014 Ernie Wing Award for Excellence in Evidence-Based Education from the Wing Institute.

Learning Objectives
Upon completing the tutorial, the learner should be able to:

  1. Describe the basic purposes of single-subject research
  2. Identify the key parts of line graphs that depict behavioral data
  3. Define level and estimate the level of a data path
  4. Define slope and estimate the slope of a data path
  5. Project the slope of baseline data into the intervention phase to compare the projected data pattern to the actual data pattern
  6. Identify whether an intervention may have caused a change in the level or slope of behavior
Technical Requirements
The tutorial requires only an active internet connection and a relatively modern web browser with JavaScript enabled.
History
This tutorial was initially developed as part of the first author’s dissertation research at Utah State University. A commercial version was released by Foxylearning in August 2015, with a significant update released in January 2020.
Katie Wolfe & Timothy A. Slocum
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Classroom Application of a Trial-Based Functional Analysis

To earn credit, you will be required to read the article and pass a 5-question quiz about it. You can retake the quiz as many times as needed, but you will not receive exactly the same questions each time.

Abstract

We evaluated a trial-based approach to conducting functional analyses in classroom settings. Ten students referred for problem behavior were exposed to a series of assessment trials, which were interspersed among classroom activities throughout the day. Results of these trial-based functional analyses were compared to those of more traditional functional analyses. Outcomes of both assessments showed correspondence in 6 of the 10 cases and partial correspondence in a 7th case. Results of the standard functional analysis suggested reasons for obtained differences in 2 cases of noncorrespondence, which were verified when portions of the trial-based functional analyses were modified and repeated. These results indicate that a trial-based functional analysis may be a viable assessment method when resources needed to conduct a standard functional analysis are unavailable. Implications for classroom-based assessment methodologies and future directions for research are discussed.

Sarah E. Bloom, Brian A. Iwata, Jennifer N. Fritz, Eileen M. Roscoe, & Abbey B. Carreau
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Increasing the Vocal Responses of Children with Autism and Developmental Disabilities Using Manual Sign Mand Training and Prompt Delay

To earn credit, you will be required to read the article and pass a 5-question quiz about it. You can retake the quiz as many times as needed, but you will not receive exactly the same questions each time.

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of manual sign mand training combined with prompt delay and vocal prompting on the production of vocal responses in nonvocal children with developmental disabilities. A multiple baseline design across participants verified the effectiveness of this intervention. All participants showed increases in vocal responses following the implementation of the independent variables.

Vincent J. Carbone, Emily J. Sweeney-Kerwin, Vivian Attanasio, & Tamara Kasper
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Acquisition of Intraverbal Behavior: Teaching Children with Autism to Mand for Answers to Questions

To earn credit, you will be required to read the article and pass a 5-question quiz about it. You can retake the quiz as many times as needed, but you will not receive exactly the same questions each time.

Abstract

Four boys with autism were taught via echoic prompting and constant prompt delay to mand for answers to questions by saying “I don’t know please tell me” (IDKPTM). This intervention resulted in acquisition of the IDKPTM response for all 4 participants and in acquisition of correct answers to most of the previously unknown questions for 2 participants. For 1 participant, tangible reinforcement resulted in increased frequency of correct answers, and direct prompting of correct answers was eventually conducted for the final participant. The IDKPTM response generalized to untargeted unknown questions with 3 participants. Results of person and setting generalization probes varied, but some generalization eventually occurred for all participants following additional training or interspersal of probe trials with training trials.

Einar T. Ingvarsson & Tatia Hollobaugh
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Teaching Effective Hand Raising to Children with Autism During Group Instruction

To earn credit, you will be required to read the article and pass a 5-question quiz about it. You can retake the quiz as many times as needed, but you will not receive exactly the same questions each time.

Abstract

We taught 3 children with autism to raise a hand or keep both hands down depending on their status (e.g., having heard a target word, possessing a specific item) using modeling, prompting, and reinforcement. All 3 children acquired accurate hand-raising skills in response to progressively more difficult discrimination tasks during group instruction. The implications for preparing children for general education settings are discussed.

Shaireen M. Charania, Linda A. LeBlanc, Narmatha Sabanathan, Inas A. Ktaech, James E. Carr, & Kristin Gunby
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Reducing Biases in Clinical Judgment with Single-Subject Treatment Design

To earn credit, you will be required to read the article and pass a 5-question quiz about it. You can retake the quiz as many times as needed, but you will not receive exactly the same questions each time.

Abstract

Psychological literature exposes a number of biases that can influence one’s judgment (e.g., pathology bias, confirmatory bias, hindsight bias, misestimation of covariance, decision heuristics, false consensus effect, and over-confidence in clinical judgment). Clinical judgment, the subjective method of arranging client data to establish a diagnosis and a treatment plan, can also be biased and may lead to inaccurate assessment and inefficient treatment. Taking repeated measures of symptoms, similar to the single subjects research design used in the behavioral sciences, may lead to better therapy because it reduces judgment bias.

Daniel J. Moran & Wendi Tai
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On the Use of Fluency Training in the Behavioral Treatment of Autism: A Commentary

To earn credit, you will be required to read the article and pass a 5-question quiz about it. You can retake the quiz as many times as needed, but you will not receive exactly the same questions each time.

Abstract

The substantial demand for behavior-analytic treatment of early childhood autism has been associated with rapid dissemination of treatment procedures to practitioners and caregivers. This level of demand could plausibly induce premature dissemination of treatments that do not yet have sufficient empirical support. We argue that this might have happened with the use of fluency training for learners with autism and identify four areas of research that are necessary to ensure that dissemination efforts are better matched to the available empirical support for this instructional strategy.

Megan R. Heinicke, James E. Carr, Linda A. LeBlanc, & Jamie M. Severtson
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Ethics of Punishment Panel Discussion

Abstract

Parents and professionals, at times, support children and adults who are at risk of harm to themselves or others. The risk might be aggression toward the parent, professional or others that results in injuries (e.g., bruises, cuts, broken bones). It might be self-injury such as head-banging or eye-gouging. It might also be running into a crowded intersection. Many treatment models attempt to reduce the likelihood and level of risk of these types of situations, but there are times when such situations occur. Parents and professionals are hopefully trained to use crisis management procedures to reduce the current situation. However, how do parents and professionals decide which crisis management procedure is likely to reduce the risk? Which crisis management procedure will reduce the risk of harm to the individual and others? These are just a few questions related to crisis management procedures. The purpose of this presentation is to provide evidence from the research literature that has addressed these questions.

About the Panel

  • Dave Manson, M.A., Ed.S. (Van Buren Intermediate School District)
  • Shawn P. Quigley, Ph.D., BCBA-D (University of New Mexico Medical Group)
  • Stacie Rulison, M.S., M.Ed., BCBA (Grand Valley State University and Parent of a Child with Autism)
Dave Manson, Shawn Quigley, and Stacie Rulison
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Cooper, Heron, and Heward’s Applied Behavior Analysis (2nd ed.): Checkered Flag for Students and Professors, Yellow Flag for the Field

To earn credit, you will be required to read the article and pass a 5-question quiz about it. You can retake the quiz as many times as needed, but you will not receive exactly the same questions each time.

Abstract

At last, the field of applied behavior analysis has a beautifully crafted, true textbook that can proudly stand cover to cover and spine to spine beside any of the expensive, imposing, and ornately designed textbooks used by college instructors who teach courses in conventional areas of education or psychology. In this review, I fully laud this development, credit Cooper, Heron, and Heward for making it happen, argue that it signifies a checkered flag for students and professors, and recommend the book for classes in applied behavior analysis everywhere. Subsequently, I review its chapters, each of which could easily stand alone as publications in their own right. Finally, I supply a cautionary note, a yellow flag to accompany the well-earned checkered flag, by pointing out that, as is true with all general textbooks on applied behavior analysis, a major portion of the references involves research on persons who occupy only a tail of the normal distribution. To attain the mainstream role Skinner envisioned and most (if not all) behavior analysts desire, the field will have to increase its focus on persons who reside under the dome of that distribution.

Patrick C. Friman
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articlequizzes ceustextbooks
Relational Frame Theory: Some Implications for Understanding and Treating Human Psychopathology

To earn credit, you will be required to read the article and pass a 5-question quiz about it. You can retake the quiz as many times as needed, but you will not receive exactly the same questions each time.

Abstract

In the current paper, we attempt to show how both the basic and applied sciences of behavior analysis have been transformed by the modern research agenda in human language and cognition, known as Relational Frame Theory (RFT). At the level of basic process, the paper argues that the burgeoning literature on derived stimulus relations calls for a reinterpretation of complex human behavior that extends beyond a purely contingency-based analysis. Specifically, the paper aims to show how a more complete account of complex human behavior includes an analysis of relational frames, relational networks, relating relations, rules, perspective-taking, and the concept of self. According to the theory, this analysis gives rise to a new interpretation of human psychopathology that necessarily transforms the applied science of behavior therapy. The current paper is divided into three parts. In Part 1, we provide a brief summary of the integrated history of behavioral psychology and behavior therapy, including their emphases on the principles of classical and operant conditioning as the basis for an account of human psychopathology. In Part 2, the core features of RFT are presented, including the three concepts of bidirectional stimulus relations, relating relations, and rule-governance that constitute critical components of the RFT approach to human psychopathology. The paper therein attempts to illustrate, with the use of clinically relevant examples, the ways in which these concepts can be used to understand psychopathology and psychotherapy. In Part 3, RFT interpretations of three central features of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), namely acceptance, defusion, and values are provided with a view to demonstrating the utility of basic RFT concepts in the treatment of human suffering.

Yvonne Barnes-Holmes, Dermot Barnes-Holmes, Louise McHugh, & Steven C. Hayes
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Functional Analysis and Treatment of Arranging and Ordering by Individuals with an Autism Spectrum Disorder

To earn credit, you will be required to read the article and pass a 5-question quiz about it. You can retake the quiz as many times as needed, but you will not receive exactly the same questions each time.

Abstract

Of the diagnostic features of autism, relatively little research has been devoted to restricted and repetitive behavior, particularly topographically complex forms of restricted and repetitive behavior such as rigidity in routines or compulsive-like behavior (e.g., arranging objects in patterns or rows). Like vocal or motor stereotypy, topographically complex forms of restricted and repetitive behavior may be associated with negative outcomes such as interference with skill acquisition, negative social consequences, and severe problem behavior associated with interruption of restricted and repetitive behavior. In the present study, we extended functional analysis methodology to the assessment and treatment of arranging and ordering for 3 individuals with an autism spectrum disorder. For all 3 participants, arranging and ordering was found to be maintained by automatic reinforcement, and treatments based on function reduced arranging and ordering.

Nicole M. Rodriguez, Rachel H. Thompson, Kevin Schlichenmeyer, & Corey S. Stocco
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Establishing a Deictic Relational Repertoire in Young Children

To earn credit, you will be required to read the article and pass a 5-question quiz about it. You can retake the quiz as many times as needed, but you will not receive exactly the same questions each time.

Abstract

Perspective-taking skills have been shown to be pivotal in a variety of social and interpersonal interactions. A better understanding of the process involved in building such a repertoire could be beneficial in a wide variety of language and social skills training programs. A relational frame theory approach to perspective taking involves a focus on deictic relations, such as I-You, Here-There, and Now-Then. The present study examined the effect of operant contingencies on deictic relational responding in 3 normally developing young (57 to 68 months old) children. In a multiple baseline across persons and tasks format, I-You, Here-There, and Now-Then deictic relational frames were successfully shaped as operant behavior. As the children acquired deictic relational frames at the Reversed and Double-Reversed levels, the children’s performance on traditional perspective-taking measures generally increased.

Timothy M. Weil, Steven C. Hayes, & Philip Capurro
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Relational Frame Theory and Skinner's Verbal Behavior: A Possible Synthesis

To earn credit, you will be required to read the article and pass a 5-question quiz about it. You can retake the quiz as many times as needed, but you will not receive exactly the same questions each time.

Abstract

The current article suggests a possible synthesis of Skinner’s (1957) treatment of verbal behavior with the more recent behavioral interpretation of language known as relational frame theory. The rationale for attempting to combine these two approaches is first outlined. Subsequently, each of the verbal operants described by Skinner is examined and subjected to a relational frame analysis. In each case, two types of operants are identified: one based on direct contingencies of reinforcement and the other based on arbitrarily applicable relational responding. The latter operants are labeled verbal because they can be distinguished from other forms of social behavior, and they appear to possess the symbolic or referential qualities often ascribed to human language. By applying relational frame theory to Skinner’s verbal operants, we aim to contribute towards the development of a modern behavior-analytic research agenda in human language and cognition.

Dermot Barnes-Holmes, Yvonne Barnes-Holmes, & Veronica Cullinan
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Are You Providing SUPER-vision?

Abstract

Professionals responsible for overseeing clinical service delivery to individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder and their families frequently provide supervision to therapists, paraprofessionals, and clinical supervisees who are responsible for direct service delivery. This supervision includes ensuring the acquisition and maintenance of skills and knowledge, the implementation of clinical services, and the collection of data. Many professionals may also be providing supervision to individuals seeking professional credentialing and licensure and who will, themselves, become supervisors in the future. Supervisors play a critical role in ensuring the skills of those providing direct therapeutic services, and in shaping the repertoires of future supervisors, but many never receive formal training on effective supervisory practices. Professionals in supervisory roles can implement specific strategies to ensure that their supervision is, in fact, super, resulting in positive client outcomes and securing a continued future of high-quality supervisors.

About the Speaker

Dr. Tyra Sellers received her Ph.D. in Disabilities Discipline – Applied Behavior Analysis from Utah State University in 2011. She is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst, and a Licensed Behavior Analyst in Utah. She is currently an assistant professor in the Department of Special Education and Rehabilitation at Utah State University and the director of the Utah Behavior Support Clinic (UBSC). She and her team provide assessment and intervention services for individuals with severe problem behavior at the university-based clinic, in homes and schools across the state, as well as provide consultative support to build and train indistrict behavior support teams for school districts. She earned a B.A. in Philosophy and an M.A. in Special Education from San Francisco State University, and a J.D. from the University of San Francisco. Dr. Sellers has over 20 years of clinical experience working with individuals with disabilities, spanning from EIBI through adult services. Her research interests include behavior variability, assessing and treating problem behavior, and effective training and supervision. She has consulted with many school districts in the United States, and with several clinical organizations and schools in Brazil and Russia. She has published thirteen research and scholarly articles, has co-authored three chapters, and regularly presents her work at local, state, regional, national, and international conferences.

Tyra Sellers
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Incorporating Supervision Best Practices Into Clinical Work

Abstract

Supervision impacts all facets of a practitioner’s work. Providing high quality supervision can ensure high quality clinical care, prepare aspiring behavior analysts to effectively supervise others, and contribute to the growth of our field. However, incorporating best practices into every day clinical work can be challenging. This breakout session will review best practices in supervision and provide recommendations for practitioners to incorporate them into practice. Participants will have the opportunity for open discussion and resource sharing.

About the Speaker

In 2008, Amber Valentino received a doctoral degree in clinical psychology from Xavier University in Cincinnati, OH. She completed a predoctoral internship and postdoctoral fellowship at the Marcus Autism Center/Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta in Atlanta, GA. After completion of her postdoctoral training, she remained at the Marcus Autism Center, serving as program coordinator of a community autism parent training program and as a senior psychologist in a language and learning clinic. In 2012, she transitioned to Trumpet Behavioral Health where she has held various leadership positions. She currently serves as the Chief Clinical Officer for Trumpet Behavior Health. In this role, she oversees clinical services, all research and training initiatives and builds clinical standards for the organization. Dr. Valentino’s clinical and research interests include the assessment and treatment of verbal behavior, primarily in children with autism. She is also interested in evaluation of programming to address unique adaptive skill deficits, and in developing standards for effective supervision in the field. Dr. Valentino currently serves as an Associate Editor for Behavior Analysis in Practice and previously served as an Associate Editor for The Analysis of Verbal Behavior. She serves as a frequent guest reviewer for several behavior analytic journals.

Amber Valentino
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Evidence-Based Practice of Applied Behavior Analysis

Abstract

The evidence-based practice of applied behavior analysis involves the integration of the best available evidence gleaned from the literature with professional judgment and client values/context. The phrase “evidence-based practice” does not imply that practitioners should randomly select among treatments identified in evidence-based practice guidelines or systematic reviews. This presentation reviews each of the components of evidence-based practice but highlights the importance of client and contextual variables that should influence treatment selection. Behavior analytic literature focusing on client variables (e.g., medical conditions that may serve as motivating operations) and contextual variables (e.g., environmental and resource constraint) are used to demonstrate why these variables are essential to effective clinical decision-making. Parental role in the determination of client and contextual variables is given a prominent position in the discussion because the least effective intervention is the one that is never used. Parents must consider variables other than the level of empirical evidence support a given treatment. The recent results of the National Autism Center’s National Standards Project 2.0 are briefly incorporated into the discussion in conjunction with a larger focus on providing appropriate behavior analytic services to clients on the spectrum.

About the Speaker

Susan Wilczynski is the Plassman Family Distinguished Professor of Special Education and Applied Behavior Analysis. Before joining the faculty at Ball State University (BSU), she served as the executive director of the National Autism Center where she chaired the National Standards Project, the most comprehensive systematic review of autism literature completed to date. She currently serves as the Director of the Center for Autism Spectrum Disorders at BSU. She developed the first center-based treatment program in the state of Nebraska while on faculty at the University of Nebraska Medical Center and was the first female faculty member with a research lab in the psychology department at the University of Southern Mississippi. Wilczynski has edited multiple books and manuals on evidence-based practice and autism and has published scholarly works in the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, Behavior Modification, Focus on Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities, Psychology in the Schools, and Education and Treatment of Children. She is a licensed psychologist and a board-certified behavior analyst. Wilczynski won the 2011 Wing Institute Award for her contributions to evidence-based practice and autism and is currently the president of the special interest group on evidence-based practice of the Association of Behavior Analysis International.

Susan Wilczynski
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Derived Manding in Children with Autism: Synthesizing Skinner's Verbal Behavior with Relational Frame Theory

To earn credit, you will be required to read the article and pass a 5-question quiz about it. You can retake the quiz as many times as needed, but you will not receive exactly the same questions each time.

Abstract

Mand functions for two stimuli (A1 and A2) were trained for 3 children with autism and were then incorporated into two related conditional discriminations (A1-B1/A2 -B2 and B1-C1/B2-C2). Tests were conducted to probe for a derived transfer of mand response functions from A1 and A2 to C1 and C2, respectively. When 1 participant failed to demonstrate derived transfer of mand response functions, transfer training using exemplars was conducted. When participants had demonstrated derived transfer of mand functions, the X1 and X2 tokens that were employed as reinforcers for mand responses were incorporated into two conditional discriminations (X1-Y1/X2-Y2 and Y1-Z1/Y2-Z2). Tests were conducted for derived transfer of reinforcing functions. Finally, tests were conducted to determine if the participants would demonstrate derived manding for the derived reinforcers (present C1 and C2 to mand for Z1 and Z2, respectively). Derived transfer of functions was observed when the sequence of training and testing was reversed (i.e., training and testing reinforcing functions before mand response functions) and when only minimal instructions were provided.

Carol Murphy, Dermot Barnes-Holmes, & Yvonne Barnes-Holmes
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Evidence-Based Practice: Myths and Realities

Abstract

The term evidence-based practice (EBP) is often confused with the act of locating treatments which have been well-supported through past research studies, and then deciding to apply these treatments to one’s work with clients. This latter model formally originated within psychology and can be called the Research-Supported Treatments (RST) initiative, and is sponsored by Division 12 (Clinical) of the American Psychological Association. EBP is a quite different approach, originating in medicine, and includes many other considerations in choosing assessment and treatment options. These other central elements include client preferences and values, professional ethics, costs, one’s own clinical expertise, available resources, all of which are valued equally with research evidence. This generic clinical decision making model of EBP has been widely adopted in many health and social care professions and is having a major impact on both services and education. This presentation reviews the history and development of both EBP and ERSTs, and suggests why the RST approach is a far more limited model of practice than EBP. EBP is quite congruent with behavior analysis, and the parallels between the two fields will be illustrated.

About the Speaker

Bruce A. Thyer, Ph.D., BCBA-D, LCSW is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst – D, and a professor of social work at Florida State University. He is a past-member of the Editorial Board of the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, and has been a member of ABAI-International since 1979. He has served on the Executive Committees of Division 25 (Behavior Analysis) of the American Psychological Association and of the Association for Professional Behavior Analysts. Holding degrees in both social work and psychology, Dr. Thyer’s academic focus has been on promoting behavior analysis within the large field of social work. He is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association, the Association for Psychological Science, the American Academy of Social Work and Social Welfare, and the Society for Social Work and Research. He has authored over 50 articles and chapters related to behavior analysis, and edited two books in our field, The Philosophical Legacy of Behaviorism (Kluwer, 1999), and Finding Solutions for Social Problems: Behavioral Strategies for Change (APA, 1996). His most recent books are Science and Pseudoscience in Social Work (Springer, 2015) and Program Evaluation: An Introduction to an Evidence-based Approach, 6th edition (Cengage, 2015).

Bruce Thyer
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Detecting and Troubleshooting Treatment Failures: A Crucial Component of Evidence-Based Practice of ABA

Abstract

Evidence-based practice (EBP) is a multi-component decision making process in which practitioners select, refine and deliver clinical services based on a) the best available scientific evidence, b) unique client and contextual features, c) training and competence of the practitioner, d) ongoing clinical progress monitoring and decision making and e) early detection and troubleshooting of treatment “failures.” Developed initially in medicine, EBP has been extended to the delivery of applied behavior analysis (ABA) services and is considered an essential feature of ethical and high quality ABA service delivery. This presentation will emphasize clinical progress monitoring as a tool for detecting treatment failures and describe a checklist for trouble shooting treatment failures.

About the Speaker

Dr. Wayne Fuqua is a Professor of Psychology and the former Chair of the Psychology Department at Western Michigan University (1999-2013). He currently teaches courses and mentors graduate students in Clinical Psychology and Behavior Analysis at WMU. Fuqua also conducts research across a range of areas including health psychology, ethics, dissemination and developmental disabilities. A Fellow of the Association for Behavior Analysis, Dr. Fuqua has published numerous peer reviewed articles and given numerous presentations and workshops at national and regional conferences. He has collaborated with researchers from WMU’s Sociology and Philosophy Departments on two NSF-funded projects on research ethics. He is actively involved with a number of community-based agencies that provide services to individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders and other developmental and physical disabilities. In his role as a member of the Michigan Autism Council (2013-2016), he was involved in developing, implementing and evaluating a
state-wide plan to improve the quality and availability of autism services in the state of Michigan. He was recently honored with a Distinguished Service Award from Western Michigan University. He has developed a series of ABA training videos for BCBA practitioners that are available, free of charge, at wmich.edu/autism/resources.

Wayne Fuqua
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Treatment Strategies for Selective Eaters

Abstract

A wide range of feeding problems are common in children with autism spectrum disorders but perhaps the most common is eating a restricted variety of table foods. Specific behavioral strategies to introduce new foods and increase the amount of each new food are discussed in detail. Signs of oral-motor skills deficits that may block treatment progress are also reviewed.

About the Speaker

Amy Kathryn Drayton, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychology at the University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital. Dr. Drayton earned her Ph.D. from Eastern Michigan University and her primary areas of interest include the comparative effectiveness of feeding interventions and cost effectiveness of behavioral treatments. She also conducts research on the treatment of disruptive behavior in children, specifically parent management training and time out.

Amy Drayton
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Problem Behavior is Predictable and Preventable

Abstract

When problem behavior such as self-injury, tantrums, aggression, or property destruction occur, observers often lament, “The behavior seems to occur for no reason; it just comes out of nowhere.” The actual scientific evidence on severe problem behavior suggests that more often than not, the behavior is quite predictable and orderly. The presenter reviews five groups of evidence to suggest that problem behavior is predictable and orderly: 1. During a functional analysis, it tends to occur under certain conditions and not others, 2. The “matching law” almost perfectly predicts the occurrence of behavior, 3. The behavior stops when it is no longer reinforced, 4. The behavior stops when the motivation to engage in behavior is removed, and 5. Alternative and less dangerous forms of behavior can be readily shaped to replace problem behavior. Based on this information, the presenter outlines a model for behavioral assessment and intervention.

About the Speaker

Timothy R. Vollmer received his Ph.D. from the University of Florida in 1992. From 1992 until 1996 he was on the psychology faculty at Louisiana State University. From 1996 to 1998 he was on the faculty at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School. He returned to the University of Florida in 1998 and is now a Professor of Psychology. His primary area of research is applied behavior analysis, with emphases in developmental disabilities, reinforcement schedules, and parenting. He has published over 130 articles and book chapters related to behavior analysis. He was the recipient of the 1996 B.F. Skinner New Researcher award from the American Psychological Association (APA). He received another APA award in August, 2004, for significant contributions to applied behavior analysis. He is also currently the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis.

Timothy Vollmer
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Practical and Ethical Methodologies for Assessing Function of Problematic Behaviors in the Natural Environment

Abstract

Some current Functional Analysis (FA) methods (Analog and Trial-based) typically rely on two elements that raise ethical concerns: 1. The direct reinforcement of the problem behavior as part of the assessment process (Analog and Trial-based methods) 2. Use of indirect data rather than direct to develop hypotheses that then guide treatment (IISCA). Additionally, many practitioners simply cannot conduct analog FA’s in many if not most applied settings. This session will describe alternative procedures and methods that focus on direct experimental tests that can be conducted in the context of home and school settings. These methods involve direct tests of consequence effects on topographies of behavior similar to the actual problem behavior. This results in the clinician having objective data on the reinforcing effects of stimuli without needing to directly reinforce potentially dangerous/injurious topographies of behavior. An advantage of such procedures is that they involve simultaneous establishment of appropriate alternative behaviors as part of the assessment procedures. Additionally, the collection and use of objective data to develop hypotheses of function enables clinicians to avoid having to test all potential functions, and focus only on those that actually occur. This efficiency may speed access to effective treatment over more laborious subjective methods. The proposed methodology provides a more ethical, conceptually systematic, and practical assessment of function.

About the Speaker

Dr. Ross is the Senior Vice President of Treatment Efficacy and Graduate Education at Beacon ABA Services of Massachusetts and Connecticut. He received his Master’s in Applied Behavior Analysis from Northeastern University and his Doctorate from Nova Southeastern University. Dr. Ross oversees all research activity at Beacon. He also provides direct and consultation services to families, schools and educational programs throughout the U.S. and Canada. He is a founding member and current Past President of the Massachusetts Association for Applied Behavior Analysis. Dr. Ross is also the President of the Autism Special Interest Group (SIG) of ABAI, and has served three terms on the ABAI Practice Board.

Robert Ross
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Using Positive Behavioral Interventions & Supports to Help Children with Autism be Successful in the Gen-Ed Setting

Abstract

Positive Behavioral Interventions & Supports (PBIS) is an evidence-based set of practices that is currently implemented in over 20,000 schools across the nation. Key features of PBIS include identifying behavior expectations, teaching the expectations, reinforcing engagement in the behavior expectations and correcting behavior errors. The intensity of supports increases as the magnitude of problem behavior increases. More intensive supports are based on functional assessment linked to behavior support plan that includes skill development and engineering the environment for success along with ongoing progress monitoring and program adjusted as needed. This presentation describes the key principals of Positive Behavioral Interventions & Supports (PBIS) and how this PBIS framework can be applied to the general education classroom setting to promote success for students with autism.

About the Speaker

Dr. Steve Goodman is the Director of Michigan’s Integrated Behavior and Learning Support Initiative (MiBLSi), a statewide initiative to improve the behavior and reading outcomes of elementary and middle school students. Holding a Ph.D. in psychology with an emphasis on Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA), he is a specialist in the area of School-wide Positive Behavior Supports. His 30 years in the field of education includes 12 years as a classroom teacher working with a full range of behavioral impairments and learning challenges, teacher consultant and adjunct professor teaching graduate and undergraduate students. Dr. Goodman has co-authored research articles in professional journals as well as several book chapters promoting a unique approach to intervention that integrates behavioral and reading learning supports.

Steve Goodman
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What Students and Educators Can Teach Us About Functional Behavior Assessment and Intervention in the Classroom

Abstract

The use of functional behavior assessments (FBAs) to inform treatment recommendations has long been established as best practice in behavior analysis from both ethical and empirical standpoints. However, the practicalities of conducting various forms of FBA (and implementing subsequent interventions) in schools sometimes poses obstacles for behavior analysts and the teachers with whom they work. The degree to which these obstacles can (and should) be overcome depends on a variety of factors that might be missed if one does not carefully consider the nature of the problems and the environments in which behaviors are expected to occur. Drawing upon nearly two decades of research and clinical work in schools, Dr. Austin will address how considering teacher and student behavior can potentially point us to more effective, efficient, and acceptable practices in conducting classroom-based assessments and interventions.

About the Speaker

Jennifer L. Austin, Ph.D., BCBA-D has been applying the science of behavior analysis to improve outcomes for children and their teachers for nearly 20 years. Both her research and clinical work focus on how behavior analytic assessment and intervention strategies can be applied with typically developing children, as well as examining what adaptations may be necessary for making our science “work” in mainstream classrooms. She has worked with numerous schools in the US and the UK, focusing primarily on those in disadvantaged communities. Dr. Austin received her PhD from the Florida State University and currently serves as Principal Lecturer in Psychology at the University of South Wales, where she leads the Behaviour Analysis Unit and directs undergraduate and postgraduate programs in behavior analysis. Prior to moving to the United Kingdom, Dr. Austin served as faculty at the University of South Florida, California State University, Fresno and the University of Houston, Clear Lake. She is the past President of the UK Society for Behaviour Analysis and a former Associate Editor of the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis and Behavior Analysis in Practice.

Jennifer Austin
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Promoting Happiness Among Adults with Autism on the Severe End of the Spectrum: Evidence-Based Strategies

Abstract

This presentation describes evidence-based strategies for promoting happiness among adults with autism on the severe end of the spectrum. The focus is on enhancing happiness to promote a desirable quality of life among adults who have challenges readily describing their emotional experiences. Initially, means of identifying and validating indicators of happiness and unhappiness on an individual basis are presented. Next, specific strategies for increasing happiness and decreasing unhappiness during daily routines are described. Examples of topics presented include how staff and others can develop good relationships with people with autism whom they support, how to identify situations accompanied by unhappiness and how to alter those situations, ways to identify and embed individual preferences within daily routines, how to provide necessary instructional and related demands in ways that are enjoyable, and how enhancing daily enjoyment can prevent and reduce challenging behavior. Throughout the presentation there is an emphasis on how promoting happiness as a desired outcome should be targeted, monitored, and evaluated just as other more traditional outcomes are addressed in human service agencies.

About the Speaker

Dr. Dennis H. Reid is a licensed psychologist and board certified behavior analyst who has spent his career providing behavioral services as a teacher, psychologist, program director, and director of psychology services. Dr. Reid shows a sustained record of impressive and outstanding applied research with major benefits for its direct participants, populations of participants, and fellow researchers. While most of his work is reported as peer-reviewed research in the most rigorous of applied journals, he has also taken the time to write books and manuals to allow this information to be exported to the widest audience. His work on reinforcer assessment/preference and happiness indices was seminal and is frequently cited. This line of preference investigation has opened new opportunities for the lives of individuals with profound, multiple handicaps. His work in staff training and management (including staff motivation) has helped other researchers and practitioners understand and use these procedures.

Dennis Reid
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Selecting, Confirming, and Maintaining an Alternative Method of Speaking for Non-Verbal Children and Adults

Abstract

Many children do not learn to communicate with spoken words. Many of these non-verbal children reach adulthood without an effective, alternative method of speaking. Some children are taught to ‘exchange pictures’, ‘select pictures on an electronic device with voice output’, or ‘use signs’. Still others are not provided with an alternative method of speaking at all. As the children become older, those who were provided with an alternative method, often abandon this method in favor of methods like ‘informal gestures’ or ‘leading others to what they want’, which are portable and which do not require special equipment. This abandonment suggests the need for systematic procedures which insure that alternative methods of speaking selected for non-verbal children are effective and endure through their adult years. The presenter describes systematic procedures for selecting an alternative method of speaking for specific learners and then testing the effectiveness of this method.

About the Speaker

Dr. McGreevy received B.S. and M.A. degrees in Psychology and Special Education, respectively, from the University of Iowa. He was a special education teacher for eight years, working with children and young adults with moderate-to-severe developmental disabilities. He received the Ph.D. degree in Education from Kansas University under the guidance of Ogden R. Lindsley. Dr. McGreevy served as an assistant research professor in the Institute for Community Studies and the Department of Special Education at the University of Missouri-Kansas City and as an assistant professor in the Department of Special Education at Louisiana State University. He taught courses in applied behavior analysis, as well as, curriculum and instruction for students with moderate-to-severe disabilities. He is the author of Teaching and Learning in Plain English, an introduction to Precision Teaching, and the founder and first editor of the Journal of Precision Teaching and Standard Celeration Charting. He is also the author of nine journal articles and a book chapter on teaching verbal behavior. He is also the first author of 14 Essential for Living, a new functional skills curriculum, assessment, and professional practitioner’s handbook for children and adults with moderate-to-severe disabilities. For the past 30 years, Dr. McGreevy has provided consultations for children and adults with developmental disabilities and hands-on training for their families. He has also provided consultation and training for school districts, residential programs, and hospitals in the United States, the United Kingdom, and Canada, specializing in the treatment of aggressive and self-injurious behavior in individuals with limited communication or language skills. Dr. McGreevy has also conducted workshops on teaching communication skills and language in the context of severe problem behavior, which are based on B. F. Skinner’s analysis of verbal behavior. From 2005-2014, Dr. McGreevy served as an assistant professor in the Behavior Analysis Program at the Florida Institute of Technology. He taught on-campus courses and seminars, and online lectures, with an emphasis on the application of principles and procedures. From 2005-2014, Dr. McGreevy served as an assistant professor in the Behavior Analysis Program at the Florida Institute of Technology. He taught on-campus courses and seminars, and online lectures, with an emphasis on the application of principles and procedures.

Patrick McGreevy
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Performance Management in Clinical Settings

Abstract

Monitoring and managing staff performance requires first defining the job and performance requirements, then designing and implementing training and management systems around those requirements. This presentation will introduce a process and tools for effective employee performance management throughout the employee life cycle.

About the Speaker

Heather M. McGee is an Associate Professor of Psychology and Co-Chair of the Industrial/Organizational Behavior Management program at Western Michigan University (WMU). She received her B.S. (1998), M.A. (2003), and Ph.D. (2004) from WMU. Dr. McGee is also co-founder of Performance Blueprints, a performance improvement consulting firm specializing in helping small businesses, non-profits & human service settings by providing a variety of consulting and training services. Dr. McGee has designed, developed and implemented organizational performance solutions in a variety of industries and settings, including autism service providers, the pharmaceutical industry, education, and health and human services. These solutions have included performance-based instruction, performance management, behavioral systems changes, and lean sigma initiatives. Additionally, Dr. McGee is the Executive Director of the Organizational Behavior Management (OBM) Network and serves as an associate editor for the Journal of Organizational Behavior Management (JOBM) and on the editorial board for Behavior Analysis: Research and Practice.

Heather McGee
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Incorporating Social Peers into ABA Instruction to Teach Social Skills

Abstract

Young children with autism often have difficulty cultivating friendships due to the language and social deficits associated with the disorder. Additionally, therapeutic environments may not be arranged to promote social interaction between individuals with autism and those without autism. As such, individuals with autism often lack appropriate models for language and social skills. Further, therapists face multiple challenges in creating therapeutic environments that mimic real-life settings in which children would apply these skills. A possible solution is to include children with autism in education and social settings with neurotypical children. This presentation will outline how to use Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) therapy in inclusive pre-school settings. The strategies outlined have been developed and evaluated at Michigan State University’s Early Learning Institute, an inclusive, early intensive behavior intervention center for young children with autism. Specific strategies discussed will include language and social skills training, facilitating activities between children with and without autism, and incorporating children with autism into typical routines observed in preschool settings.

About the Speaker

Kate LaLonde, Clinical Director at Early Learning Institute (ELI) and an Assistant Professor with a joint appointment in Counseling, Educational Psychology & Special Education (CEPSE), Human Development and Family Studies. LaLonde is an assistant professor of special education, a Board Certified Behavior Analyst – Doctoral (BCBA-D) and the Clinical Director of the Early Learning Institute. Her research focuses on using behavior analysis to solve socially significant problems. She spent time in Tanzania as a researcher at APOPO (https://www.apopo.org/en/), an NGO using operant conditioning procedure to teach giant African pouched rats to detect landmines and tuberculosis. Her research also focuses on problems often observed in individuals with autism spectrum disorders and other developmental disabilities. She is specifically interested in increasing vocal speech, complex social skills, and physical activity in children and adults. She has also published in natural environment teaching and behavioral gerontology.

Kate LaLonde & Kenzie Gatewood
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What Constitutes a Behavioral Approach to Autism Treatment?

Abstract

It is clear that the principles and procedures that constitute behavior analysis can have a significant impact on individuals with autism. However, with the recent passage of several insurance bills, many are now claiming to provide behaviorally based services. In addition, schools attempting to implement behavioral programs have few guidelines as to what actually constitutes a behavioral program. We as professional behavior analysts need to define our practice in a way that provides clearer guidance and criteria for those claiming or attempting to provide behavioral services. This presentation provides some suggestions regarding what constitutes a behavioral approach to autism treatment.

About the Speaker

Mark L. Sundberg, Ph.D., BCBA-D received his doctorate degree in Applied Behavior Analysis from Western Michigan University (1980), under the direction of Dr. Jack Michael. He is the author of the Verbal Behavior Milestones Assessment and Placement Program (VB-MAPP), and co-author of the original ABLLS and the book Teaching Language to Children with Autism or Other Developmental Disabilities. He has published over 50 professional papers and 4 book chapters. He is the founder and past editor of the journal The Analysis of Verbal Behavior, a twice pastpresident of The Northern California Association for Behavior Analysis, a past-chair of the Publication Board of ABAI, and has served on the Board of Directors of the B. F. Skinner Foundation. Dr. Sundberg has given hundreds of conference presentations and workshops nationally and internationally, and taught 80 college and university courses on behavior analysis, verbal behavior, sign language, and child development. He is a licensed psychologist with over 40 years of clinical experience who consults for public and private schools that serve children with autism. His awards include the 2001 “Distinguished Psychology Department Alumnus Award” from Western Michigan University, and the 2013 “Jack Michael Outstanding Contributions in Verbal Behavior Award” from ABAI’s Verbal Behavior Special Interest Group.

Mark Sundberg
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Autism from Age 2 to 26: What Can We Learn About Treatment from Longitudinal Studies

Abstract

As the number of preschool children identified with ASD increases each year, so too will the number of children with ASD moving into adolescence.The aims of the research are to determine predictors of adolescent and adult outcome measured in adaptive skills, quality of life, positive mood, behavior problems and symptoms of anxiety and depression. The project represents a shift in emphasis from attention primarily on negative outcomes to consideration of coping strategies for individuals and families and their impact on well-being and independence.The natural history of behavioral, cognitive, language and social development from ages 2 to 22 are examined in two well-described samples of children from North Carolina and Chicago originally referred for possible ASD, and a group of non-spectrum developmentally delayed controls. One hundred eighty seven out of 213 original children currently remain in the Early Diagnosis study initially funded by NIMH and NICHD.These children were seen at ages 2, 3, 5 and 9.Their families have participated in phone interviews and completed packets of questionnaires when the children were between 11 and 18 years with a focus on relationships among adaptive skills, behavior problems, pubertal development and adolescent onset of seizures.Face to face interviews and assessments from age 10 to 26 have been conducted so we have new results about what adults are now doing and experiencing.We hope these studies can provide important information about individual differences in developmental trajectories in ASD and the factors that contribute to positive and negative aspects of outcome in adolescents and young adults.

About the Speaker

Catherine Lord, Ph.D. Professor of Psychology, Weill Cornell Medical College & Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons and Director of the Center for Autism and the Developing Brain. Dr. Lord is an international expert in the diagnosis, social and communication development and intervention in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). She is renowned for her work in longitudinal studies of children with autism as well as for her role in developing the autism diagnostic instruments used in both practice and in research worldwide today. She has also been involved in the development of standardized diagnostic instruments for ASD with colleagues from the United Kingdom and the United States (the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS) an observational scale; and the Autism Diagnostic Interview – Revised (ADI-R) a parent interview), now considered the gold standard for research diagnoses all over the world. Dr. Lord’s work at the Center for Autism and the Developing Brain involves continued research in validity and longitudinal studies, early diagnosis of children with autism, and regression in children with autism and clinical evaluation and diagnosis of children and adults who may have autism.

Catherine Lord
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Essential Competencies for Practitioners Working with Children Diagnosed with Autism

Abstract

The practice of Applied Behavior Analysis gets more complex with each passing year, and the definition of essential competencies continues to expand. Our understanding of how to apply the science and technology of ABA becomes increasingly nuanced and sophisticated with the advancement of research and the development of clinical tools. This presentation focuses on the essential competencies for practitioners that will enable clinicians to remain aware of best practice recommendations, to stay close to the evidence-based nature of our science, and to apply our interventions in ethical and humane ways.

About the Speaker

Mary Jane Weiss, Ph.D., BCBA-D is a Professor at Endicott College, where she directs the Master’s Program in ABA and Autism and is a mentoring faculty member in the Doctoral program. She also does research with the team at Melmark. Dr. Weiss has worked in the field of ABA and Autism for over 30 years. She received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Rutgers University in 1990 and she became a Board Certified Behavior Analyst in 2000. She previously worked for 16 years at the Douglass Developmental Disabilities Center at Rutgers University, where she served as Director of Research and Training and as Clinical Director. Her interests center on defining best practice ABA techniques, evaluating the impact of ABA in learners with autism, teaching social skills to learners with autism, training staff to be optimally effective, and maximizing family members’ expertise and adaptation. She serves on the Scientific Council of the Organization for Autism Research, is a regular reviewer for a variety of professional journals, and is a frequent member of service committees for the Behavior Analyst Certification Board. She is also a Past President of the Autism SIG at ABAI and a former member of the Board of APBA.

Mary Jane Weiss
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Visual Support Strategies to Teach Recreation and Leisure Skills to Adults with Developmental Disabilities

Abstract

Recreation and leisure skills are an important part of everyone’s daily lives. These skills are important for rest and relaxation as well as improving one’s quality of life. Three studies assessing the effectiveness of visual support strategies to teach recreation and leisure activities to adults with developmental disabilities will be presented. In Study 1, we taught an adult with Down Syndrome three activities (painting a picture, listening to music on an iPod, and taking pictures) using a video prompting procedure. In Study 2, we utilized a picture schedule intervention to teach three adults with intellectual disability to use an iPad in order to play Angry Birds. In Study 3, we taught three adults with disabilities to play Fruit Ninja with a video modeling intervention. Results suggest that visual strategies of instruction are an easy and efficient way to teach new skills to adults with disabilities. Practical implications of this line of research and future directions will be discussed.

About the Speaker

Dr. Jeff Chan is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Special and Early Education at Northern Illinois University. His professional experiences include delivering intensive behavioral intervention for children with autism, working with students with severe developmental disabilities in elementary and secondary school settings, and supporting adults with developmental disabilities in employment settings. Dr. Chan earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from University of California, Los Angeles and, upon graduation, worked closely with Dr. Ivar Lovaas, a world-renowned innovator in the field of autism treatment. During this time, Dr. Chan conducted research with young children with autism and began teaching college-level courses on the topic of behavioral intervention. He also relished in the opportunity to work as an instructor with children with autism aged 2-12 in home and school settings. Dr. Chan then went on to earn Masters of the Arts and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in Special Education at The University of Texas at Austin, specializing in autism and developmental disabilities. While in Austin, Dr. Chan continued to work with children with disabilities. He served as a behavior specialist at The Odyssey School, a private school for middle and high school students with learning disabilities, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, and Asperger Syndrome. Dr. Chan’s current research interests include using mobile technologies (iPods, tablet computers) to teach functional life skills and leisure skills to individuals with developmental disabilities. In his free time, Dr. Chan enjoys spending time with his wife and four young children, playing guitar, and watching movies.

Jeff Chan
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Teaching Problem Solving to Increase Academic, Communication, and Social Skills

Abstract

Problem solving is defined as manipulating stimuli to increase the probability of arriving at a solution to a problem. When given a problem, such as a math problem or a question that involves recalling a past event, an individual arrives at a solution by engaging in a few behaviors, such as asking herself questions, drawing out possible solutions, and visualizing. A challenge of analyzing problem solving is it often occurs covertly, or within an individual’s skin. Although typically developing people engage in problem solving on a daily basis, there is limited research on teaching problem solving strategies to individuals with disabilities, especially in a behavior analytic framework. Two potential benefits of teaching problem solving skills to children with autism are less rote responding and more generalization. The presenter will provide a conceptual analysis of problem solving and review previous research on using problem solving to teach academic, communication, and social skills. The presenter will also describe his research on teaching problem solving to help children with autism recall past events, and he will recommend directions for research and practice.

About the Speaker

Judah B. Axe, Ph.D., BCBA-D, LABA, is an Associate Professor of Education and Behavior Analysis at Simmons College and the Director of the Special Education Program at Simmons. Dr. Axe received his M.A. and Ph.D. in Special Education and Applied Behavior Analysis from The Ohio State University. He conducts research with children with autism and related disabilities in the areas of verbal, social, and challenging behavior. Three current research topics are the effects of problem solving on recalling past events, the effects of echoic responding on multiply controlled intraverbals, and the effects of pre-session pairing on compliance and problem behavior. Dr. Axe serves on the editorial boards of The Analysis of Verbal Behavior, Behavior Analysis in Practice, and Behavioral Interventions. He has served as Chair of the Verbal Behavior Special Interest Group of the Association for Behavior Analysis International (ABAI), Co-Coordinator of the Verbal Behavior Area for the ABAI Conference, Chair of the Student Relations Committee of the Berkshire Association for Behavior Analysis and Therapy, and Trustee and the Continuing Education Coordinator of the Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies.

Judah Axe
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Teleconsultation in Autism Treatment: Applications and Considerations

Abstract

This presentation reviews the literature on teleconsultation as it applies to autism treatment. Examples of the variety of ways in which teleconsultation is being used as a part of the treatment of autism are discussed. Potential problems with the practice and future directions for research are also presented.

About the Speaker

Stephanie M. Peterson, Ph.D., BCBA-D, is a Professor of Psychology at Western Michigan University. She earned her doctorate in Special Education at The University of Iowa in 1994. Her primary research interests are choice making, functional communication training, reinforcement-based interventions for children with problem behavior, and concurrent schedules of reinforcement in the treatment of severe problem behavior and in functional analysis of problem behavior. She also has interests in applications of behavior analysis to educational interventions and teacher training. She currently serves on the Editorial Board of the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis and is a Senior Editorial Consultant for Education and Treatment of Children.

Stephanie Peterson
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How Can We Increase the Impact of Behavior Analysis in Solving Problems in New Areas?

Abstract

Behavior analysis is a powerful tool that could ameliorate many of society’s problems. One of the first problems that was seriously addressed with a behavior analytic approach was the treatment of autism. Although a behavioral approach yielded promising results from the start, it took many years before the behavioral approach was accepted as the treatment of choice for autism. Although promising data have also been obtained from applications of behavioral technology to many other social problems, these applications have not yet been widely accepted or disseminated. Skinner envisioned behavior analysis as a technology that would address a wide variety of societal challenges. Initially behavior analysts were highly enthusiastic about society adopting our approach in areas such as education, but many people already working in these fields were resistant to a behavioral approach. This presentation examines a number of areas where behavior analysis could make a difference, and explore ways to overcome obstacles and accelerate the acceptance of our approach.

About the Speaker

Dr. Van Houten received his BA from SUNY at Stony Brook and his MA and Ph.D. from Dalhousie University where he received training in the Experimental Analysis of Behavior. He is currently Professor of Psychology at Western Michigan University. Dr. Van Houten has published extensively in JABA on a wide variety of problems, ranging from the education of inner city youth and children with “learning disabilities”, the treatment of children and adults with developmental delays, the treatment of clinical problems in children, traffic safety, energy conservation, and aviation safety. Currently Dr. Van Houten is a member of the Transportation Research Board and a member of the National Committee for Uniform Traffic Control Devices. He is a past AE for the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis and a Fellow of the ABAI. In 2013 he received the Waller Award from the National Academy of Science and in 2015 he received the Award for Scientific Translation Impact of Science on Application from the Society for the Advancement of Behavior Analysis. Dr. Van Houten is also an avid pilot flying power aircraft and gliders and a flight instructor.

Ron Van Houten
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Favors, Facts, and Fishnets: Shaping Autism Law and Policy

Abstract

In 2004, the New York Times wrote that “no disability claims more parental time and energy than autism.” Families dealing with autism face many hardships, not the least of which is financial hardship. One reason for the financial hardship is the failure of the health insurance industry to cover treatments for, and sometimes even diagnosis of, autism. As recently as the turn of the millennium, it was widely accepted that health insurance did not cover even the standard treatments for autism. Since 2007, there has been a fast-moving national movement toward autism insurance reform. More than 40 states have now enacted legislation requiring insurers to cover autism interventions, including ABA. In this session, we examine the language of the autism insurance laws, including a comparison of their key terms and features. You will learn about the different types of public and private health insurance plans, with a particular emphasis on recent activity in Medicaid policies. The potential pitfalls that consumers may face when attempting to utilize benefits are discussed. Finally, effective strategies for influencing autism-related policy decisions are presented.

About the Speaker

Lorri Unumb is a lawyer, professor, and the mother of three children – Ryan (15), who has classic autism; Christopher (12); and Jonathan (8), who has Asperger’s. In 2005, she wrote groundbreaking autism insurance legislation for South Carolina (“Ryan’s Law”) that served as the catalyst for the national autism insurance movement. Lorri began her autism advocacy as a volunteer. In 2008, she was recruited by Autism Speaks to work full-time and has since testified more than 100 times on health insurance issues around the country. For her advocacy efforts, Lorri has been recognized with many awards including:

  • BACB’s Michael Hemingway Award
  • California Association of Behavior Analysts “Leadership in Law” Award
  • APBA “Jerry Shook” Award
  • NASCAR Foundation’s Betty Jane France Humanitarian Award

Lorri’s work has been profiled on CNN, on NPR’s “Morning Edition,” and in Town&Country magazine, from whom she received one of three 2009 “Women Who Make a Difference” awards. She is profiled in the American Academy of Pediatrics book “Autism Spectrum Disorders: What Every Parent Needs to Know.” Following law school, Lorri clerked for a federal judge and then enjoyed a fulfilling career as an appellate litigator with the United States Department of Justice. She left DOJ to become a law professor at George Washington University Law School and later served as an inaugural faculty member at the Charleston School of Law. While in Charleston, she hosted a weekly TV show called “The Law with Professor Lorri.” Lorri teaches a course at GW Law called “Autism and the Law.” She and her husband wrote the first-ever comprehensive textbook on legal issues related to autism, also called “Autism and the Law.” She also founded the Autism Academy of South Carolina in 2011.

Lorri Unumb
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Programming for Success: Critical Elements of an Effective Intervention for Individuals with Autism

Abstract

Professionals who provided services to individuals with a diagnosis of autism strive to help these learners reach their fullest potential. However, many instructional programs for individuals with autism fail to devote sufficient instructional time on those skills that will result in the greatest overall rate of acquisition. In order to facilitate the rapid acquisition of critical language and learning skills it is important to prioritize both the selection of specific learning objectives and the teaching activities. When selecting learning objectives, it is important to select developmentally appropriate skills to teach based on the learner’s age and skills in relation to development as demonstrated by typically-developing individuals. The actual development of skills requires active participation in teaching activities throughout the day by a motivated learner in a wide variety of situations. Most importantly, parents and other caregivers need to develop and consistently implement effective teaching strategies, and track the development of the learner’s skills over time so that timely adjustments can be made and new learning targets can be identified.

About the Speaker

James W. Partington, PhD, BCBA-D is the director of Behavior Analysts, Inc., and provides services to children and their families at the STARS Clinics in Walnut Creek, California. He is a licensed psychologist and a board certified behavior analyst, doctoral level (BCBA-D), and has more than 45 years experience working with children with developmental disabilities. His expertise is in language-based intervention with children who are experiencing language delays as a result of autism and other related developmental disorders. Dr. Partington is the co-founder of a school that specialized in language-based instruction for children with autism (STARS School) and has helped several public school systems establish similar classrooms within their own districts. He has been a faculty member of several universities including West Virginia University, University of San Francisco and St. Mary’s College. Dr. Partington is a former President of the Northern California Association for Behavior Analysis and has served as a member of the Behavior Analyst Certification Board. Dr. Partington has received several professional awards including the Public Service Award for the Advancement of Behavior Analysis in Florida, presented by the Florida Association for Behavior Analysis. He has co-authored the book, Teaching Language to Children with Autism or Other Developmental Disabilities, and The Assessment of Functional Living Skills (The AFLS®). He is the author of several books including The Assessment of Language and Learning Skills-Revised (The ABLLS-R®), Capturing the Motivation of Children with Autism, and Getting Started: Developing Critical Learning Skills for Children on the Autism Spectrum.

James Partington
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How to Systematically Evaluate Treatments for Autism That Lack an Evidence Base

Abstract

With over 400 treatments for autism, behavior analysts are sometimes placed in a position where they must monitor the effects of alternative or ancillary treatments that lack an evidence base. Behavior analysts must be mindful about how they evaluate treatments that lack an evidence base in order to determine whether or not they produce desired outcomes. This presentation will provide an overview of research methods to evaluate such treatments and will highlight notable research studies that evaluated questionable treatments (e.g., weighted vests and sensory integration) for individuals with autism.

About the Speaker

Matthew T. Brodhead, Ph.D., BCBA-D, is an Assistant Professor at Michigan State University. His research examines the behavioral determinants of response variability and decision-making in children with autism. He is also interested in research and conceptual issues relating to the ethical and professional behaviors of practicing behavior analysts. Through workshops and consultation, he has established multiple school-based programs for children with autism, and he has provided training to teachers, related service providers, and behavior analysts throughout the United States.

Matthew Brodhead
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Promoting Quality in Adult Services for People with Autism: Evidence-Based Strategies

Abstract

This presentation will describe critical, evidence-based strategies for promoting and maintaining quality within services specifically for adults with autism. The strategies to be presented are based on over four decades of behavior analytic research and application in residential and day-support settings for adults with autism and other severe disabilities. Topics to be discussed include the fundamental differences in goals for services for adults versus children, basic skill sets required of support staff, key performance responsibilities of staff warranting regular attention and action by supervisors, characteristics of environments that promote meaningful and enjoyable daily routines, and supervisory performance expectations and skills necessary for ensuring day-to-day quality in service provision. The most common obstacles to quality services will also be presented along with research based means of overcoming the obstacles.

About the Speaker

Dr. Dennis H. Reid is a licensed psychologist and board certified behavior analyst who has spent his career providing behavioral services as a teacher, psychologist, program director, and director of psychology services. Dr. Reid shows a sustained record of impressive and outstanding applied research with major benefits for its direct participants, populations of participants, and fellow researchers. While most of his work is reported as peer-reviewed research in the most rigorous of applied journals, he has also taken the time to write books and manuals to allow this information to be exported to the widest audience. His work on reinforcer assessment/preference and happiness indices was seminal and is frequently cited. This line of preference investigation has opened new opportunities for the lives of individuals with profound, multiple handicaps. His work in staff training and management (including staff motivation) has helped other researchers and practitioners understand and use these procedures.

Dennis Reid
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Practical Ethics for the Effective Treatment of Autism Spectrum Disorder

Abstract

This workshop is for behavior analysts working directly with, or supervising those who work with, individuals with autism. The workshop addresses important topics such as the principles and values that underlie the Behavior Analyst Certification Board’s ® Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts, and factors that affect ethical decision-making. In addition, the workshop addresses critical and under-discussed topics of: scope of competence; evidence-based practice in behavior analysis; how to collaborate with professionals within and outside one’s discipline; and how to design systems of ethical supervision and training that customized to unique treatment settings. Across many of the topics, the presenters also discuss errors students and professionals may make during analyses of ethical dilemmas and misapplications of ethical codes within their practice.

About the Speakers

  • David J. Cox, Ph.D., MSB, BCBA-D: David has been working clinically in Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) since 2006. He has worked with children, adolescents, and adults with diagnoses ranging from autism spectrum disorders and developmental disabilities​​ to substance use disorders and obesity. David is currently a research fellow in the Behavioral Pharmacology Research Unit in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. His current areas of focus are choice behavior, preference, behavioral economics, and the application of these areas to clinical intervention, clinical decision making, and ethical behavior.
  • Matthew T. Brodhead, Ph.D., BCBA-D: Matthew T. Brodhead is an assistant professor at Michigan State University and the research director of the Early Learning Institute. His research examines focused social skill interventions for children with autism. He also writes about conceptual issues relating to the ethical and professional behavior of practicing behavior analysts. He is on the editorial board of multiple journals, including the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, Behavior Analysis in Practice, and The Analysis of Verbal Behavior. He is also the co-guest editor for the forthcoming special issue in Behavior Analysis in Practice on diversity and equity in the practice of behavior analysis.
  • Shawn P. Quigley, Ph.D, BCBA-D: Shawn Quigley is the Senior Director of Clinical Services and Professional Development at Melmark, PA. He earned his doctorate degree in Behavior Analysis at Western Michigan University. He completed a post-doctoral psychology fellowship with the University of New Mexico Medical Group. The fellowship provided Dr. Quigley an opportunity to conduct diagnostic evaluations in an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) clinic, support families and individuals with ASD, and help build capacity for behavior analytic providers. Dr. Quigley has professional experiences in many capacities from direct care to administration across many different entities. He has had opportunities to manage a federally-funded research grant; help develop county-level mental health service systems for adults and children; help develop state regulatory guidelines for autism services; and direct the development of clinical and training practices. These experiences have provided a strong foundation for understanding service development, regulatory requirements, scope of competence issues, resource allocation, and service delivery. Dr. Quigley has supported the profession through service on editorial review boards; publishing research; being active with regional and national service groups; teaching at multiple universities; and volunteering as a subject matter expert for the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB).
David Cox, Shawn Quigley, & Matthew Brodhead
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ASD and Sleep: Helping Children (and their families!) Get a Good Night's Sleep

Abstract

Optimal sleep demonstrates strong correlations with improved learning, physical health and overall behavioral functioning. Yet, little is known about how toassess and manage sleep concerns in populations at greater risk for sleep problems such as children and adolescents diagnosed with an ASD. The current presentation will be divided into two sections. The first will be an outline of common medical issues related to sleep and basic behavioral sleepprinciples. The second portion of the talk will focus upon evidence-based assessment and intervention specific to pediatric populations with ASD. The primary goal of the session is to arm providers and families with the information needed to identify sleep problems early and provide resources to help with intervention.

About the Speaker

Dr. Dawn Dore-Stites completed her graduate training in clinical psychology at Western Michigan University. Her training included internship at Children’s Hospital of Michigan which focused specifically upon pediatric psychology, a branch of psychology that blends child clinical and health psychology. After internship, she completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Michigan, where she was fortunate to receive additional training in behavioral interventions in pediatric sleep and elimination disorders. Clinically, Dr. Dore-Stites works with children and adolescents struggling with sleep disorders and elimination disorders (fecal or urine incontinence). Dr. Dore-Stites relies on evidence-based treatment including behavioral and cognitive-behavioral strategies and tailors treatment to the individual needs of the child and their family.

Dawn Dore-Stites
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Better Outcomes Demand Better Graphing

Abstract

Applied and basic researchers in behavior analysis depend on the visual analysis of graphic data. The roots for visual analysis began at the inception of behavior analysis. However, a growing concern within single-case design exists. Namely, the use of supplemental statistics for graphed time series data. Many criticisms leveled against single case design stem from a lack of universal decision rules and unreliability across raters illustrate the limitations of visual analysis. Critics suggest adding statistical or quantitative analyses to visual analysis provides objectivity, increased confidence of the results, and enhances the strength of the outcome. The following presentation will present studies showing the many shortcomings in graphing and how to strengthen the fields analytical and decision making capacity.

About the Speaker

Dr. Richard (Rick) Kubina has a bachelor’s degree (Psychology) from Youngstown State University and a master’s and a doctoral degree (Special Education) from The Ohio State University. Dr. Kubina is a Professor of Special Education at The Pennsylvania State University and co-founder of Chartlytics. Dr. Kubina has published multiple research articles, books, and book chapters on evidenced-based education and measurement of student progress. He also served as the past Editor of the Journal of Precision Teaching & Celeration. Dr. Kubina consults with school districts and charter schools using Precision Teaching, effective practice methods, and other measurably superior educational programs.

Rick Kubina
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Improving the Lives of Students with Autism by NOT Focusing on their Disability

Abstract

This presentation will share how Haugland Learning Center (HLC) and its staff use the science of human behavior to improve educational functioning for children with autism. HLC is a private school in Ohio serving more than 300 students with an autism diagnosis. Focus will be on how our professional values and philosophy plays a role in the services we provide. Too often behavior analysts focus on the autism diagnosis and “canned” treatment approaches, missing the Analysis part of ABA. As a result, progress may be limited lending ammunition to those criticizing our science. This presenter believes that our values and how we approach interventions for individuals with autism play a significant role in the level of improvement for those we serve. HLC’s values include the statements: “Having Autism is not an excuse for lower expectation” and “Kids don’t fail because they have autism, but because they are not taught”. HLC is focusing on education rather than treatment and sets high expectations for all students. Staff are not allowed to use the label of autism as an excuse for a students’ failure to learn. Our students make significant improvements in academic and social functioning through focus on effective instruction based on our science. Data will be presented showing how the Morningside Model of Generative Instruction have produced great improvement across all academic areas. A critical overview of the components of our program will be shared.

About the Speaker

Dr. Morten Haugland, founder and CEO of Haugland Learning Center, started serving individuals with special needs from the time he immigrated to the US from Norway in 1990. After coming to the United States, he started working as a direct care staff in a group home for adults with disabilities. There he was introduced to behavior analysis by the staff Behavior Analyst, a graduate from Western Michigan University, and decided to pursue his education in behavior analysis. He completed his Bachelor Degree in Psychology from Northern Michigan University in 1994 and received a Masters Degree in Applied Psychology from St. Cloud State University in 1996. Dr. Haugland then completed his Ph.D. and a second Masters Degree in ABA and Special Education at The Ohio State University in 2000. After being a faculty at Otterbein College in Ohio, he started Haugland Learning Center (HLC), a school for children with autism in 2004. HLC currently employ about 230 staff and have 6 location around the state. Currently over 400 students across Ohio receive educational services from HLC. Dr. Haugland holds a national certification as a Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA-D). He helped start the Ohio chapter of ABAI and was instrumental in pushing legislation for Certified Ohio Behavior Analysts (COBA). His special interest area is effective instruction, Precision Teaching and the use of ABA principles in educational settings including effective classroom management strategies. He started the National Institute for Effective Instruction in 2015. This organization holds an annual conference on effective instruction in Columbus each year.

Morten Haugland
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The Effects of a Text Message Prompt on Conversation Between Dyads with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Abstract

Many forms of technology are now a mainstay of families, such as smartphones, iPads, computers and the like. Easy to use procedures that can be implemented on these devices in naturalistic settings are being developed. These treatment procedures are less stigmatizing, easy to use, do not require apps, and can be used with any of these technologies available in the classroom, home, and community. This presentation will focus on a series of studies using smartphones and iPads to increase the social speech of children with autism spectrum disorder in naturalistic settings.

About the Speaker

Marjorie H. Charlop, Ph.D., BCBA, has dedicated her life’s work to helping children with ASD and their families. She is Professor of Psychology at Claremont McKenna College and Director of The Claremont Autism Center, her renowned research and treatment center for children with ASD and their families. As a Licensed Psychologist, she also maintains a private practice and consultation services. Dr. Charlop has hundreds of professional conference presentations and publications in the field of autism and has done workshops and lectures around the globe. Her book, “How to Do Naturalistic Teaching Strategies with a Focus on Incidental Teaching with Autism Spectrum Disorders” is in its second edition. Her latest book, “Play and Social Skills for Children with ASD” will also be out soon. Dr. Charlop’s research areas focus on the treatment of communication, motivation, social skills, and behavior problems. Using technology is among her newer research interests. Parent collaboration and education is among her primary areas of practice.

Julia Blanco & Marjorie Charlop
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The Verbal Behavior Milestones Assessment and Placement Program (VBMAPP): An Overview

Abstract

Typically the primary focus of an intervention program for children with autism should be on the development of effective language and social skills. There clearly are several other areas in need, such as self-care, visual motor skills, academics, fine and gross motor, etc., but language and social skills are typically the most significant deficits for children with autism. The failure to conduct an appropriate assessment results in one of the biggest problems in programs that serve children with autism: An inappropriate curriculum. Our first task is to identify the existing skills of each child. Our next task is to identify the language, social, behavior and learning barriers that are preventing more rapid learning. The VB-MAPP is a tool that is easy to use and will provide teachers, parents, and staff with the necessary information to develop an appropriate intervention program. The VB-MAPP is an assessment tool based on B.F. Skinner’s (1957) analysis of verbal behavior and typical developmental milestones. This presentation will provide the attendee an overview and an understanding of the importance of incorporating Skinner’s analysis of verbal behavior into language assessment.

About the Speaker

Carl Sundberg, Ph. D., BCBA-D, is the chief clinician and founder of the Behavior Analysis Center for Autism. He received his doctorate degree in ABA from Western Michigan University under the direction of Dr. Jack Michael. While a graduate student, he taught behavior analysis at WMU for seven years. Dr. Sundberg has publications in The Analysis of Verbal Behavior and A Collection of Reprints on Verbal Behavior. Dr. Sundberg has over 30 years of experience using behavioral interventions to teach individuals with autism and other developmental disabilities. He oversees the training of all the staff at BACA and consistently spends time with the clients. Eighty percent of his time is spent contributing to the training of staff and addressing specific client programs.

Carl Sundberg
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Social Motivation Theories of Autism: Is Insensitivity to Social Reward Really the Problem?

Abstract

Some theories of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) implicate a neurobiologically driven insensitivity to social reward as the basis for social deficits, and less directly, other core diagnostic features of ASD. This is sometimes referred to as the Social Motivation Theory of Autism and has, on occasion, been used to justify avoiding social reinforcers when working with individuals with ASD. I will review and discuss evidence, from my lab and others’, for and against this insensitivity. I will specifically consider: (a) studies on identifying or verifying socially-mediated reinforcers in ASD; (b) studies that compare social and nonsocial reinforcers in ASD; and (c) studies that compare social reward in persons with and without ASD. I will conclude with alternative interpretations and questions that need to be answered to make sense of these theories.

About the Speaker

Dr. Iser DeLeon earned his Ph.D. at the University of Florida, where he is now a Professor of Psychology. Recent prior positions of his include Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Director of Research Development for the Department of Behavioral Psychology at the Kennedy Krieger Institute. Dr. DeLeon currently serves as President of the Board of Directors of the Behavior Analyst Certification Board. In addition, he is on the Board of Directors of the Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior and has served as Associate Editor for both the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis and the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior. Over the past 15 years, Dr. DeLeon’s research has been supported by several private and federal agencies, including the National Institute of Mental Health and the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. This research has focused on assessment and treatment of aberrant behavior in persons with neurodevelopmental disorders, identification of preferences and determinants of choice, and translation of basic behavioral processes towards enhancing therapeutic and instructional outcomes.

Iser DeLeon
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Matter of Great Consequence: The Standard Celeration Chart

Abstract

The most popular time series visual display used in practice and research is the linear graph. Recent inquiry into fields such as behavior analysis and special education demonstrates widespread variability with how practitioners and researchers construct graphs. One study showed an 85% error construction rate across approximately 4,400 line graphs. Graphs serve a critical function for people receiving treatment: analysis, interpretation, decision making, and communication of results. The Standard Celeration Chart offers a solution at least 10x better than nonstandard linear graphs for all of the previously listed outcomes. All people with ASD who receive treatment across time deserve the most responsive and information-rich statistical graphic available. The following presentation will provide reason and evidence showing how the Standard Celeration Chart offers high caliber visual representations of data and precision metrics and analytics. Better data analysis fosters sound decision making and accelerated achievement of outcomes.

About the Speaker

Dr. Richard (Rick) Kubina has a bachelor’s degree (psychology) from Youngstown State University, a master’s and a doctoral degree (special education) from The Ohio State University. Kubina is a Professor of special education at The Pennsylvania State University and co-founder of Chartlytics. Kubina has published multiple research articles, books, and book chapters on evidence-based education and measurement of student progress. Kubina has consulted with school districts and charter schools using Precision Teaching, effective practice methods, and other measurably superior educational programs.

Rick Kubina
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Navigating Higher Education with ASD

Abstract

This presentation will discuss some of the strategies and supports developed to support undergraduate and graduate students with ASD navigate academia at Oakland University (OU). A 2016 Survey conducted at OU revealed that most students with ASD were not registered with disability services nor did they need the traditional services provided to students with disabilities. Most were honor students and had excellent GPAs, but often lacked the soft skills to make good team members on group projects. Both Faculty and participants identified that they failed to make friends in their classes and had difficulty bonding with classmates or socializing. As a response to the data gathered Genius-to-Genius, an innovative program was developed at Oakland University. It is helping students build relationships, enhance their socialization skills and transition to college life by pairing them with peer consultants who are trained to help them through the process. By targeting academic and life skills our program has been successful at addressing many of the social issues as well as retention and attrition issues experienced with the ASD college population.

About the Speaker

Chaturi Edrisinha is a board-certified behavior analyst. She received her Ph.D. in autism and developmental disabilities and her M.Ed. in early childhood special education from The University of Texas at Austin. An overarching agenda in Dr. Edrisinha’s research is to develop instructional and support strategies in order to foster independence and inclusion for persons with autism spectrum disorders. She has been successful in obtaining multiple research grants totaling more than $100,000. She published more than 60 peer-reviewed articles, conference papers, and book chapters in many prestigious journals, including the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, Research in Developmental Disabilities, and the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disabilities and presented at numerous national and international conferences.

Chaturi Edrisinha
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What’s in a Name? Exploring What it Means to Supervise

Abstract

Due to the Behavior Analyst Certification Board’s recent release of the fifth-edition task list, supervision has become a common topic among Board Certified Behavior Analysts. However, the word “supervise” seems to hold various meanings. From a behavior-analytic perspective, what does it mean to “supervise?” The field of Organizational Behavior Management (OBM) offers over 40 years of research directly related to this question. Using information gained from the four decades of research, this series of presentations will walk the audience through a supervisor’s journey in identifying root causes of performance issues and building solutions that result in performance improvement.

About the Speakers

Dr. Heather M. McGee is an Associate Professor of Psychology and Chair of the Industrial/Organizational Behavior Management program at Western Michigan University (WMU). She received her B.S. (1998), M.A. (2003), and Ph.D. (2004) from WMU. Dr. McGee is co-founder of Performance Blueprints, a performance improvement consulting firm specializing in helping small businesses, non-profits & human service settings by providing a variety of consulting and training services. In her consulting work, Dr. McGee has designed, developed and implemented organizational performance solutions in a variety of industries and settings, including autism service providers, the pharmaceutical industry, education, and health and human services. These solutions have included performance-based instruction, performance management, behavioral systems changes, and lean sigma initiatives. Dr. McGee is the former Executive Director of the Organizational Behavior Management (OBM) Network and serves as an associate editor for the Journal of Organizational Behavior Management (JOBM) and on the editorial board for Behavior Analysis: Research and Practice. Additionally, Dr. McGee is on the Board of Directors of ALULA™, a management consulting firm, and on the Advisory Board of DataFinch Technologies, a behavior analytic technology firm.

Dr. Jeana Koerber, BCBA-D, is the Executive Director of Autism Services at the Great Lakes Center for Autism Treatment and Research, which she joined in 2014 as the Clinical Director. She holds a bachelor’s degree in Psychology from Western Michigan University (WMU), a master’s degree in Industrial and Organizational Psychology from WMU and a Ph.D. degree in Behavior Analysis from WMU. Jeana has worked in a variety of settings with individuals with developmental disabilities providing direct services to individuals and developing management systems for staff providing direct services. Jeana is also a Board Certified Behavior Analyst. Before starting at the Great Lakes Center, Jeana worked at the Kellogg Company in the Sales Learning and Development department. Jeana’s research interests involve staff management techniques, performance management processes in human service settings and verbal behavior approaches to language.

Sally Weigandt, MA, BCBA currently a doctoral student in the Industrial/Organizational Behavior Management Graduate Program at Western Michigan University (WMU). She earned her B.S. in Behavioral Science and Business in 2015 and earned her M.A. in Applied Behavior Analysis in 2017 from WMU. Sally currently works with human service organizations to help them develop and implement performance improvement strategies through the use of Behavioral Systems Analysis. She is especially interested in using a three-levels systems approach to designing sustainable interventions for performance problems. Sally is committed to research-driven approaches to staff assessment, management, and training and aims to disseminate the science of behavior analysis through the use of effective workplace strategies. In addition, Sally is a graduate teaching assistant for both undergraduate and graduate courses in behavior analysis at WMU, having assisted in the development and teaching of courses in personnel training and development, behavioral systems analysis, and advanced topics in organizational behavior management. Sally is also an ongoing guest reviewer for the Journal of Organizational Behavior Management.

Heather McGee, Jeana Koerber, & Sally Weigandt
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Ethics of Standardization of Practice

Abstract

The standardization of decision-making in behavior-analytic practice may reduce practitioner effort while simultaneously freeing resources to engage in other, and perhaps more complex, tasks. However, the extent to which standardized processes for decision-making improve practitioner performance, and subsequently improve client outcomes, is not quite clear. Furthermore, the ethical implications of standardizing decision-making processes require careful consideration. The purpose of this presentation is to present three recent research studies on the standardization of decision-making in behavior analysis, using visual analysis as a case example. The purpose and results of the reviewed studies will be discussed in the context of ethical and professional issues (e.g., scope of competence, the right to effective treatment, and individualized behavior-change programs) that are at the forefront of practicing-behavior analysts.

About the Speaker

Matthew T. Brodhead, Ph.D., BCBA-D, is an Assistant Professor at Michigan State University. His research examines the behavioral determinants of response variability and decision-making in children with autism. He is also interested in research and conceptual issues relating to the ethical and professional behaviors of practicing behavior analysts. Through workshops and consultation, he has established multiple school-based programs for children with autism, and he has provided training to teachers, related service providers, and behavior analysts throughout the United States.

Matthew Brodhead
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Higher Ed, ASD, and Sexuality

Abstract

When a high school student with ASD enters as a freshman at an university, he or she immediately loses access to the benefits and coverage of IDEA and enters the world of ADA and FERPA. The responsibility for identifying, documenting, initiating services and advocacy shift from the school personnel to the individual student. University students over 18 are considered adults. Issues related to relationships, sexuality, sexual health, consent and sexual behaviors are topics that are not always specifically addressed with students regardless of of their prior history of accessing services through K-12. Yet, we find that these are the very issues that high achieving students on the ASD spectrum struggle most with. Left unaddressed these behaviors may result in negative outcomes to the individual and their quality of life but also the university community affecting college attrition, completion rates, and campus culture. This presentation will discuss some ways to address this timely topic with students on the ASD spectrum that may have implications for neurotypicals who may have similar questions.

About the Speaker

Chaturi Edrisinha is a board-certified behavior analyst. She received her Ph.D. in autism and developmental disabilities and her M.Ed. in early childhood special education from The University of Texas at Austin. An overarching agenda in Dr. Edrisinha’s research is to develop instructional and support strategies in order to foster independence and inclusion for persons with autism spectrum disorders. She has been successful in obtaining multiple research grants totaling more than $100,000. She published more than 60 peer-reviewed articles, conference papers, and book chapters in many prestigious journals, including the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, Research in Developmental Disabilities, and the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disabilities and presented at numerous national and international conferences.

Chaturi Edrisinha
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Conceptualizing Sexuality Education for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Abstract

This workshop is designed to provide an overview of sexuality education as it is uniquely addressed to meet the needs of individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder. The workshop will begin with an overview of topics that need to be included in comprehensive sexuality education (e.g., biological aspects of sexuality, sexual safety, public masturbation, sexuality orientation and gender identity, etc.). Curricula that may be useful to individuals seeking to acquire expertise in sexuality education will be discussed. Resources for acquiring expertise in sexuality education will be provided. Attendees can expect to leave with knowledge regarding the topic of sexuality education but should not anticipate acquiring the expertise needed to provide sexuality education to individuals with ASD at the conclusion of the workshop.

About the Speaker

Susan Wilczynski is the Plassman Family Distinguished Professor of Special Education and Applied Behavior Analysis. Before joining the faculty at Ball State University (BSU), she served as the executive director of the National Autism Center where she chaired the National Standards Project, the most comprehensive systematic review of autism literature completed to date. She currently serves as the Director of the Center for Autism Spectrum Disorders at BSU. She developed the first center-based treatment program in the state of Nebraska while on faculty at the University of Nebraska Medical Center and was the first female faculty member with a research lab in the psychology department at the University of Southern Mississippi. Wilczynski has edited multiple books and manuals on evidence-based practice and autism and has published scholarly works in the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, Behavior Modification, Focus on Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities, Psychology in the Schools, and Education and Treatment of Children. She is a licensed psychologist and a board-certified behavior analyst. Wilczynski won the 2011 Wing Institute Award for her contributions to evidence-based practice and autism and is currently the president of the special interest group on evidence-based practice of the Association of Behavior Analysis International.

Susan Wilczynski
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Training the Parent Trainer

Abstract

Most of a client’s hours are spent away from the main training environment. Most of our clients go home to their parents after day therapy. What becomes critical is that the methods used in ABA therapy are transferred to the home environment. There are many challenges however. The first challenge is that the BCBA must provide a behavioral repertoire to the parents. It took most of us years to establish the behavior repertoire we now have to effectively work with our clients. Aside from teaching a general behavior repertoire, it is important to know what specific targets and procedures need to be put in place. The second challenge is understanding and working around the barriers that are in place for the parents to follow thought with the BCBA’s recommendations. Consider all of the competing contingencies in place in the home. The parents may work all day, have other children, and have multiple household tasks that need to be completed. Add to that, they may not understand why it is important to do some of the things they are asked of them when it seems that there are easier ways (e.g., just give the child a hug and he will stop his tantrum). Finally, there may be situations arise where the technician feels uncomfortable in the home or she may witness a behavior from a parents that could meet criteria for call CPS. This workshop will provide the attendee the tools needed to have the most successful parent training experience possible.

About the Speakers

Carl Sundberg, Ph. D., BCBA-D, is the chief clinician and founder of the Behavior Analysis Center for Autism. He received his doctorate degree in ABA from Western Michigan University under the direction of Dr. Jack Michael. While a graduate student, he taught behavior analysis at WMU for seven years. Dr. Sundberg has publications in The Analysis of Verbal Behavior and A Collection of Reprints on Verbal Behavior. Dr. Sundberg has over 30 years of experience using behavioral interventions to teach individuals with autism and other developmental disabilities. He oversees the training of all the staff at BACA and consistently spends time with the clients. Eighty percent of his time is spent contributing to the training of staff and addressing specific client programs.

Carl Sundberg
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What You Need to Know to Be a Behavior Analyst

Abstract

A couple generations ago a popular academic activity was to point out to behavior analysts their relative insularity. This was at a time when most behavior analysts came to the field from other areas. Even if some were island-bound, most had been to other places. They should see us now! With training and credentialing sequences aimed at everyone from high school camp counselors through the seasoned Ph.D.s, now expanding beyond the ability of some programs to contain them, we can keep our members’ attention so tightly focused inward that they don’t even notice there is a horizon, much consider that there might be interesting and useful things beyond it. Indeed, we have reached a point were many behavior analysts who treat children with autism have had a graduate sequence in child behavior. This cannot be good for us (or the kids), and as Edwin Willems predicted in 1974, there will be an inevitable narrowing of the field to practice in very specific areas. Of course, with a narrowing of our assessment and treatment choices, we will also find ourselves harboring the illusion of increased general effectiveness, including in areas where we don’t have a presence. This presentation will explore some of the variables that led us to this situation, including some of the actual disciplinary benefits of insularity, and how behavior analysts might nevertheless safely and politely travel to other traditions to find sound, evidence-based information and techniques that might be usefully incorporated into their own work.

About the Speaker

Dr. James Todd is a Professor of Psychology at Eastern Michigan University. Much of his recent work involves the analysis of ineffective and pseudoscientific interventions for autism and other developmental disabilities, especially “facilitated communication” and “rapid prompting.” He has served as an expert for the Defense in cases involving false accusations of abuse arising from these methods. Most recently he was an expert witness for the Prosecution in the Stubblefield assault case in New Jersey discussing the scientific evidence against the validity of facilitated communication.

James Todd
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Functional Behavior Assessment in Public Schools

Abstract

When conducting school-based FBA’s there are additional factors that often need to be considered relative to completing FBA’s in other settings. We will address several of these factors, including potential barriers that should be considered when conducting a school-based FBA. Additionally, we will review the components needed for completing a meaningful school-based FBA along with providing examples of ways to link the results of your assessment to appropriate school-based interventions.

About the Speakers

Dr. Christie Nutkins, a fully licensed psychologist and board certified behavior analyst, has spent over 10 years providing behaviorally based services for children and their families. While she has successfully worked with children and adolescents experiencing a wide range of educational and behavioral challenges; the majority of her training and expertise falls in the area of assessment and treatment of children with developmental delays, most specifically Autism Spectrum Disorders. With her background working in educational, clinical, and home-based settings, she strives to develop realistic, yet effective intervention plans that meet the needs of the client and family.

Abbey Mix is an LMSW and BCBA. She is employed by Kent ISD as an Autism Coach working with regional and local district teams to build capacity and enhance the quality of programming for students with Autism.

Christie Nutkins & Abbey Mix
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Integrating Technology into Practice: Why, What, Where, When, How

Abstract

Modern digital technologies such as apps, hardware, and adaptive devices can help persons with autism learn new skills and provide opportunities for practice, application, and problem-solving. These tools can individualize learning, and help learners schedule their day, participate in socialization opportunities with peers close by or across the globe, help and even help them find a voice. We now can know in “real time” what’s been learned or what might need more attention. Learners reap greatest benefit from technology when their teachers apply knowledge of behavioral concepts/principals to select and use these tools. Several digital and hardware technology tools will be reviewed within the categories of instruction/academics, social skills/behavior management, and communication/information. During demonstrations and interactive activities participants will learn about various applications and tools, identify any correspondence with evidence-based behavioral principles, and evaluate if and how each might be useful in their instructional context.

About the Speaker

Dr. Janet Twyman is an education innovator, thought leader, and founder of Blast: a learning sciences company. She’s also the Director of Innovation and Technology for the Center on Innovations in Learning, Associate Professor of Pediatrics at the Univ. of Mass. Medical School, and formerly the Vice President of Instructional Development, Research, & Implementation at Headsprout. Her numerous articles, book chapters, and presentations cover behavior analysis, instructional design, technology, and educational systems; she also co-edited two books on educational innovation and personalized learning. She has presented to and worked with education systems, organizations, and institutions over 40 states and countries, including speaking about technologies for diverse learners and settings at the United Nations. She serves on several boards and committees, and co-chairs the education group for the Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies. In 2007-08 she served as the President of the Association for Behavior Analysis and in 2014 was named an ABAI Fellow. For her distinguished contributions to educational research and practice she received the 2015 Wing Award for Evidence-based Education and the 2017 American Psychological Association Division 25 Fred S. Keller Behavioral Education Award.

Janet Twyman
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Ethics Potpourri: Philosophy, Research, Supervision, and Practice

Abstract

Professional and ethical behaviors are critical for high quality care and consumer protection. But, how is ethical behavior taught, strengthened, and maintained? The science of behavior offers multiple philosophies and strategies to teach, strengthen, and maintain ethical behavior. For example, a behavioral systems approach may increase the probability of employees engaging in ethical and professional behaviors because systems may describe “what to do” instead of “what not to do” when faced with a professional or ethical issue. Furthermore, a systematic approach to ethical training and supervision may ensure behavior analysts provide culturally appropriate treatments, as well as practice within their boundaries of competency. During this workshop, participants will discuss ethical philosophies that guide decision making (Brodhead, 2019; Brodhead, Cox, & Quigley, 2018; Rosenberg & Schwartz, 2018), discuss strategies for teaching and maintaining ethical behavior in an organization (Brodhead & Higbee, 2012; Brodhead, Quigley, & Cox, 2018), discuss strategies for defining scope of competence (Brodhead, Quigley & Wilczynski, 2018), discuss strategies for building and maintaining relationships in interdisciplinary settings (Brodhead, 2015), discuss strategies for developing cultural awareness (e.g., Fong, Catagnus, Brodhead, Quigley, & Field, 2016), and considerations of ethics in research and practice (e.g., Quigley, Blevins, Cox, Brodhead, & Kim, 2017).

About the Speaker

Shawn Quigley is the Senior Director of Clinical Services and Professional Development at Melmark, PA. He earned his doctorate degree in Behavior Analysis at Western Michigan University. He completed a post-doctoral psychology fellowship with the University of New Mexico Medical Group. The fellowship provided Dr. Quigley an opportunity to conduct diagnostic evaluations in an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) clinic, support families and individuals with ASD, and help build capacity for behavior analytic providers. Dr. Quigley has professional experiences in many capacities from direct care to administration across many different entities. He has had opportunities to manage a federally-funded research grant; help develop county-level mental health service systems for adults and children; help develop state regulatory guidelines for autism services; and direct the development of clinical and training practices. These experiences have provided a strong foundation for understanding service development, regulatory requirements, scope of competence issues, resource allocation, and service delivery. Dr. Quigley has supported the profession through service on editorial review boards; publishing research; being active with regional and national service groups; teaching at multiple universities; and volunteering as a subject matter expert for the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB).

Shawn Quigley
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PBIS in the Classroom

Abstract

Learn how to enhance and modify the supports for students with disabilities within the general education classroom setting within the Positive Behavior Intervention Supports (PBIS) framework. This session will discuss intensifying supports and aligning with student need based on the student’s Individualized Education Plan (IEP).

About the Speaker

Dr. Steve Goodman is the Director of Michigan’s Integrated Behavior and Learning Support Initiative (MiBLSi), a statewide initiative to improve the behavior and reading outcomes of elementary and middle school students. Holding a Ph.D. in psychology with an emphasis on Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA), he is a specialist in the area of School-wide Positive Behavior Supports. His 30 years in the field of education includes 12 years as a classroom teacher working with a full range of behavioral impairments and learning challenges, teacher consultant and adjunct professor teaching graduate and undergraduate students. Dr. Goodman has co-authored research articles in professional journals as well as several book chapters promoting a unique approach to intervention that integrates behavioral and reading learning supports.

Steve Goodman
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Strategies for Promoting Complex Social Play in Children with Autism Using Photographic Activity Schedules

Abstract

Play serves an important function in the lives of young children. Through play, children learn about the world around them and come to understand the social rules and conventions that define the human experience. Many young children with autism spectrum disorders, however, do not develop the skills necessary to play appropriately with other children or even when alone. Over the past several years, behavioral researchers have developed support strategies to teach young children with autism to play using a visual cueing system called photographic activity schedules in combination with social scripting and script fading. In the current presentation, strategies for using activity schedules and script fading to promote both independent and complex social play will be described and discussed. Recent research illustrating the effective use of activity schedules and script fading to promote complex social play between children with autism and their typically developing peers will also be presented and discussed.

About the Speaker

Dr. Thomas S. Higbee is a Professor and Interim Department Head in the Department of Special Education and Rehabilitation at Utah State University. He serves as the Director of the Autism Support Services: Education, Research, and Training (ASSERT) program, an early intensive behavioral intervention program for children with autism that he founded in 2003. He is a doctoral-level Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA-D) and a Licensed Behavior Analyst in the state of Utah. He is also chair of the Disability Disciplines doctoral program at Utah State University. His research focuses on the development of effective educational and behavioral interventions for children with autism spectrum disorders and related disabilities as well as the development of effective training strategies for teaching parents and professionals to implement effective interventions. He is a former associate editor for the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis (JABA) and the European Journal of Behavior Analysis. Dr. Higbee is committed to the dissemination of effective behavioral interventions and has helped to create intensive behavior analytic preschool and school programs for children with autism and related disorders in Brazil, Russia, Portugal, and throughout his home state of Utah. He is the past president of the Utah Association for Behavior Analysis (UtABA) and has served as a member of the Practice Board of the Association for Behavior Analysis International (ABAI) and the Psychologist Licensing Board of the state of Utah.

Thomas Higbee
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Improving Conversational Skills of College Students with ASD

Abstract

Entry to college marks the greatest transition of young adulthood; early adaptations to this new landscape are likely to affect wellbeing during the college years and beyond. Students who exhibit social differences associated with Autism Spectrum Disorder, such as limited or inflexible conversation skills, are especially vulnerable to a poor transition. The college experience of intellectually capable students with ASD is too often characterized by academic failure, conflicts with peers, loneliness, and missed opportunities to prepare for fulfilling work and relationships in adulthood. The purpose of my presentation is to describe research findings and some objective lessons from our recent efforts to assess and treat the social deficits of college students with ASD.

About the Speaker

Dr. Amanda Karsten is an assistant professor in the Department of Psychology at Western Michigan University. She works primarily with WMU students and practicum supervisors who participate in the Extended University (Hybrid) track of the Master of Arts in Behavior Analysis Program. Dr. Karsten has over 16 years of experience practicing ABA and conducting applied research with people diagnosed with autism from early childhood through young adulthood. Prior to joining the faculty of WMU in summer 2017, Dr. Karsten was an associate professor at Western New England University. She currently serves on the editorial board of Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis (JABA) and a former Associate Editor for The Analysis of Verbal Behavior (TAVB). Dr. Karsten and her student collaborators have published their research in peer-reviewed journals such as JABA, TAVB, and Behavior Modification.

Amanda Karsten
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The Generalization of Mands

Abstract

The ability to make requests, conceptually referred to as the mand relation, is a type of verbal operant whose response form is under control of a motivating operation (MO). It is the first verbal operant to be acquired, directly benefits the speaker, leads to the development of other behaviors, and may serve to replace problem behavior. Even though the topography of the mand is under the functional control of an MO, its occurrence is influenced by a multitude of variables functioning as discriminative stimuli (SDs). Thus, the generalization of mands can occur across both MOs and SDs. Additionally, the same MO may evoke new mand topographies—a form of response generalization. During this talk, I will describe these two types of mand generalizations as a way to influence future research and clinical practice, as well as how to promote them.

About the Speaker

Dr. Caio Miguel is a Professor of Psychology at California State University, Sacramento and an Adjunct Doctoral Advisor for the Ph.D. Program in ABA at the Institute for Behavioral Studies at Endicott College. Caio also serves as an Adjunct Professor (Professor Colaborador) at the Department of Experimental Psychology at the University of Sao Paulo – Brazil. ​He obtained his bachelors degree in Psychology at the Pontificia Universidade Catolica de São Paulo in Brazil, and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) at Western Michigan University under the co-advisement of Dr. Jack Michael and Dr. James Carr. Caio has been a Board Certified Behavior Analyst-Doctoral (BCBA-D) since 2004.

Caio Miguel
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Implementing Video Modeling with Learners with Autism Spectrum Disorders

Abstract

Video modeling is an instructional procedure that involves showing a learner a video of another person performing a behavior and then creating an environment for the target learner to perform a similar behavior (Bellini & Akulian, 2007). It is a highly effective educational practice for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) who are able to attend to and follow a model. Advances in portable video capture and playback technology offer the potential for practitioners to instantly access models for teaching various skills (Wilson, 2013). However, the process of designing and delivering the intervention requires logistical planning and careful instructional design. This presentation will describe practical tactics and strategies for using video modeling with individuals with ASD. Content will include instructional design features as well as logistical tactics that ease implementation of video modeling. Recommended strategies will draw heavily from our experimental studies conducted over the past 10 years (Duenas, Plavnick, & Bak, 2019; Plavnick & Ferreri, 2011; Plavnick, Sam, Hume, & Odom, 2013; Plavnick & Vitale, 2016; Stauch, Plavnick, Sankar, & Bernacki, 2018). Attendees will learn to select target behaviors to teach individuals with ASD using video models, script and capture video models efficiently, systematically present and fade video models when teaching, analyze outcomes to determine when learners are ready for more advanced video-based instruction, and to determine when video modeling may not be an optimal teaching procedure for individuals with ASD.

About the Speaker

Joshua Planck is an assistant professor at Michigan State University in the Department of Counseling Educational Psychology, and Special Education (CEPSE), and director of the Graduate Certificate program in Applied Behavior Analysis. He focuses on applications of behavioral and observational learning theories to develop and evaluate instructional programming for students with autism spectrum disorders and intellectual disabilities. He is currently developing and researching a comprehensive reading program for school-aged children with ASD and is working with the new Early Learning Institute at MSU, a multilevel early intervention program for young children with ASD.

Joshua Plavnick
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Integrating the Topic of Sexuality for School-Aged Individuals with Autism

Abstract

Many parents with children with Autism have difficulty seeing their children as sexual beings. They often don’t know how to provide the needed supports for their children to have a healthy sexual life. This presentation will address parental issues in regards to sexuality and autism including strategies on how to talk with your child about their changing bodies, when to have the “talk” and what to expect. Strategies for individuals needing varying supports across the spectrum will be discussed.

About the Speakers

Chaturi Edrisinha is a board-certified behavior analyst. She received her Ph.D. in autism and developmental disabilities and her M.Ed. in early childhood special education from The University of Texas at Austin. An overarching agenda in Dr. Edrisinha’s research is to develop instructional and support strategies in order to foster independence and inclusion for persons with autism spectrum disorders. She has been successful in obtaining multiple research grants totaling more than $100,000. She published more than 60 peer-reviewed articles, conference papers, and book chapters in many prestigious journals, including the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, Research in Developmental Disabilities, and the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disabilities and presented at numerous national and international conferences.

Chaturi Edrisinha
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Beyond Instruction: Closing the Educational Gaps for Children with Autism

Abstract

The ASPIRE program at Haugland Learning Center uses the Morningside Model of Generative Instruction to ensure that students with autism receive the best educational services possible. Combining the model with staff coaching and multi-level data analysis allows us to maximize potential for each student. This presentation will focus on the three main components of the model: instruction, practice, and application and detail how we supplement the model to ensure success with students with autism. Processes for analyzing data and coaching staff to ensure students continue to work toward meeting high educational and behavioral expectations will be detailed. Participants will have the opportunity to ask questions and participate in activities to help solidify their understanding of the material presented.

About the Speaker

Dr. Morten Haugland, founder and CEO of Haugland Learning Center, started serving individuals with special needs from the time he immigrated to the US from Norway in 1990. After coming to the United States, he started working as a direct care staff in a group home for adults with disabilities. There he was introduced to behavior analysis by the staff Behavior Analyst, a graduate from Western Michigan University, and decided to pursue his education in behavior analysis. He completed his Bachelor Degree in Psychology from Northern Michigan University in 1994 and received a Masters Degree in Applied Psychology from St. Cloud State University in 1996. Dr. Haugland then completed his Ph.D. and a second Masters Degree in ABA and Special Education at The Ohio State University in 2000. After being a faculty at Otterbein College in Ohio, he started Haugland Learning Center (HLC), a school for children with autism in 2004. HLC currently employ about 230 staff and have 6 location around the state. Currently over 400 students across Ohio receive educational services from HLC. Dr. Haugland holds a national certification as a Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA-D). He helped start the Ohio chapter of ABAI and was instrumental in pushing legislation for Certified Ohio Behavior Analysts (COBA). His special interest area is effective instruction, Precision Teaching and the use of ABA principles in educational settings including effective classroom management strategies. He started the National Institute for Effective Instruction in 2015. This organization holds an annual conference on effective instruction in Columbus each year.

Morten Haugland, Kathy Fox, & Jason Guild
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Evaluating the Reliability and Sensitivity of the VB-MAPP as an Outcome Measure in Autism Research

Abstract

The VB-MAPP is a curriculum guide and an assessment tool that is commonly used in autism interventions. Little is known about its psychometric properties, specifically its inter-rater reliability. Moreover, few studies have utilized this measurement tool when evaluating longitudinal intervention outcomes in autism research. We evaluated the interrater reliability of the VB-MAPP and utilized it as an outcome measure for low-intensity behavioral interventions. The results indicated that the milestones had good reliability and the barriers had moderate reliability. However, some of the individual milestone domains and barrier domains did not fare as well. When used as an outcome measure in autism research, the VBMAPP provided similar findings as the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale and appeared to be more sensitive at detecting low-dosage intervention gains. The implications of these findings are discussed for practitioners and researchers who utilize the VB-MAPP as a curriculum guide and as an research tool.

About the Speakers

Dr. Amin “Duff” Lotfizadeh is the Director of Research at Easterseals Southern California and Khrystle Montallana is the Autism Services Regional Training Supervisor at Easterseals Southern California.

Amin Lotfizadeh & Khrystle Montallana
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Preparing and Supporting Individuals with Autism for Success in Higher Education

Abstract

An increasing number of individuals with autism are entering adulthood without adequate preparation for successful transitions to college. Behavior analysts have much to offer these individuals as they prepare for life after high school. This presentation will provide an overview of skills critical for successfully navigating post-secondary education environments. The presentation will focus on how to assess and teach a variety of important skills. Outcomes of research and practice for teaching social skills and for providing supports to college students with autism will be described.

About the Speaker

Dorothea Lerman is currently a Professor of Psychology and Behavior Analysis at the University of Houston – Clear Lake, where she directs a master’s program in behavior analysis and serves as Director of the UHCL Center for Autism and Developmental Disabilities. She received her doctoral degree in Psychology from the University of Florida in 1995, specializing in behavior analysis. Her areas of expertise include autism, developmental disabilities, early intervention, functional analysis, teacher and parent training, and treatment of severe behavior disorders. Dr. Lerman has published more than 80 research articles and chapters, served as Editor-in-Chief for The Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis and Behavior Analysis in Practice and has secured more than $2 million in grants and contracts to support her work. She was the recipient of the 2007 Distinguished Contribution to Applied Behavioral Research Award and the 2001 B.F. Skinner Award for New Researchers, awarded by Division 25 of the American Psychological Association. She also was named a Fellow of the Association for Behavior Analysis-International in 2008. Dr. Lerman is a Licensed Behavior Analyst and a Board Certified Behavior Analyst.

Dorothea Lerman
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Abuse and Autism Spectrum Disorder

Abstract

Individuals with disabilities are at significantly greater risk for abuse than the general population. This presentation addresses the unique challenges of assessing, implementing prevention, and addressing abuse that involves individuals with ASD. In addition, societal variables such as power differentials often existing between the roles of individuals with ASD and their care providers or limited resources to address abuse in our communities will be discussed because they place individuals with ASD at greater risk. Strategies practitioners and parents can use for decreasing the likelihood abuse will occur will be identified. Resources for increasing knowledge about abuse and disabilities will be provided.

About the Speaker

Susan Wilczynski is the Plassman Family Distinguished Professor of Special Education and Applied Behavior Analysis. Before joining the faculty at Ball State University (BSU), she served as the executive director of the National Autism Center where she chaired the National Standards Project, the most comprehensive systematic review of autism literature completed to date. She currently serves as the Director of the Center for Autism Spectrum Disorders at BSU. She developed the first center-based treatment program in the state of Nebraska while on faculty at the University of Nebraska Medical Center and was the first female faculty member with a research lab in the psychology department at the University of Southern Mississippi. Wilczynski has edited multiple books and manuals on evidence-based practice and autism and has published scholarly works in the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, Behavior Modification, Focus on Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities, Psychology in the Schools, and Education and Treatment of Children. She is a licensed psychologist and a board-certified behavior analyst. Wilczynski won the 2011 Wing Institute Award for her contributions to evidence-based practice and autism and is currently the president of the special interest group on evidence-based practice of the Association of Behavior Analysis International.

Susan Wilczynski
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Promoting Successful Aging Through the Lifespan for Individuals with ASD and Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Abstract

As all people age through adulthood and into older adulthood, they experience unique opportunities and challenges such as shifts in their career, shifts in their life focus, shifts in their social networks, and age-related physical changes. An important theme among researchers in gerontology (the study of aging) is evaluating how these changes impact quality of life, or how happy someone is with their life. Indeed, a great deal of research and effort has gone into understanding how people can experience the opportunities and challenges of aging while ensuring they maintain a high quality of life. Said another way, this research focuses on understanding how to age successfully. An important growing focus in gerontology research is expanding quality of life research to understand and support aging adults with autism spectrum disorder and intellectual and developmental disabilities. Applied behavior analysis, with its focus on improving socially important behaviors through the systematic application of behaviorally grounded interventions, is uniquely poised to provide empirical answers and evidence-based approaches to helping this population age successfully. This presentation will first discuss the current notions of aging successfully and how that applies to aging adults with autism spectrum disorder and intellectual and developmental disabilities. It will then cover existing knowledge of barriers to successful aging. The presentation will then focus on existing applied behavior analytic research and approaches that promote successful aging, as well as areas ripe for applied behavior analytic research and intervention.

About the Speaker

Dr. Jonathan Baker is a clinical faculty specialist in the Department of Psychology at Western Michigan University. Prior to joining WMU, he was an associate professor and coordinator of the gerontology certificate program, as well as a faculty member in the behavior analysis and therapy program in the Rehabilitation Institute at Southern Illinois University. He received a certificate in gerontology from the University of Kansas, a master’s in applied behavior science from the University of Kansas, and a Ph.D. from Western Michigan University. Dr. Baker is on the Board of Directors for the Behavior Analyst Certification Board. He is an Associate Editor at Behavior Analysis: Research and Practice as well as in the AE mentorship program for the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis. He
has served as a guest reviewer for multiple behavior analytic journals, as well as the American Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementias and The Gerontologist. Dr. Baker is the former president of the Mid-American Association of Behavior Analysis and former chair of the Behavioral Gerontology Special Interest Group with ABAI. Dr. Baker was the principle investigator for the Behavioral Residential In-home Care and Supports (BRICS) project evaluation for the Illinois Department of Aging and is currently a coprincipal investigator for Behavior Analysis and Intervention in Nursing Homes, funded by the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services. Dr. Baker’s research interest are behavioral gerontology, treatment adoption, adults and older adults with developmental disabilities, and staff training.

Jonathan Baker
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